New Electronic Document Management System in Drexel Library!

 

Scanbookscan2Center™ technology brings library use to the
next generation with the latest software; seamless
scanning network integration, and remote system diagnostics.

This electronic document management system, equipped with effortless document sharing, is fully compatible with email, Google Docs, and other external devices, such as flashdrives.

The new scanner system has two new functions: save scanned documents to your Google drive, or sends document to not only SJU email system but other email systems like Gmail, Hotmail, etc.

 

Illuminating the Mission — 7 Days – 7Pages

To commemorate Pope Francis’ visitSt. John's Bible8
to the U.S., the Post Learning Commons and Drexel Library
will be participating in a sharing of the Saint John’s Bible in a unique way.

In solidarity with all those across the country owning the Bible and participating, each day starting
Monday, September 21st and ending on Sunday,
September 27th, a different page of the Bible will be
displayed. For each page of the day, Saint John’s School of Theology has written a reflection incorporating the
artwork and spiritual message conveyed.

For more information see Illuminating the Message on the Saint John’s Bible website.

Altered Hours This Weekend as Philadelphia Welcomes Pope Francis

popeprofileDue to Pope Francis’ visit, Post Learning Commons and
Drexel Library will have altered hours and services the
weekend of September 25 – 27.

Friday, September 25th
8:00am – 9:00pm
Normal Library Hours and Services

Saturday, September 26th
10:00am – 6:00pm
The Post Learning Commons Building will be open to current students, faculty and staff. The building will not be open for visitors. The Drexel Library building will be closed.
Research assistance will be available only through our chat service.

Sunday, September 27th
12:00pm – 6:00pm
The Post Learning Commons will be open to students, faculty and staff. The building will not be open to visitors.
6:00pm – 12 midnight
Both the PLC and Drexel Library will be open from 6:00 pm until midnight.

Normal hours and services will resume on Monday, September 28th.

If new details are released concerning security measures or road closures, these hours may change. Please check the library’s web site for the latest news.

A Visit with Pope Francis and the Holy Family

8 flight into egypt 2

Andean School, The Flight into Egypt, 18th century oil on canvas
Saint Joseph’s University Collection

The exhibition, “A Visit with Pope Francis and the Holy Family,” commemorates Pope Francis’ first visit to the United States and
his historic visit to Philadelphia for the World Meeting of Families (26-27 September 2015). Picking up on the latter theme, the exhibit features paintings from Spanish Colonial America of Gospel events in the life of the Holy Family. These paintings are selected from the Saint Joseph’s University Collection and are juxtaposed with texts drawn from the homilies, talks, and addresses of Pope Francis
reflecting on the subjects depicted in these art works.

This mode of presentation offers the opportunity to “enter into” what St. Ignatius of Loyola (1491-1556) in the Spiritual Exercises calls the “mysteries” of the life of Jesus, Mary and Joseph, accompanied and guided by Pope Francis himself. It also bears comparison with Ignatius of Loyola’s “method and order of meditating and contemplating,” as Pope Francis “narrate[s] […] the facts of the contemplation or meditation” so as to help the viewer garner “spiritual relish and fruit” (Spiritual Exercises, no. 2).

In the course of Pope Francis’s guided meditations on the
Holy Family, many of his signature themes are salient. These themes are of a piece with his project of “waking up” the Church and the world—laity, ordained and consecrated persons, all people of good will. And so for Pope Francis, Jesus’s birth in Bethlehem,
for example, manifests “the humility of God taken to the extreme,”
as He assumes “our frailty, our suffering, our anxieties, our desires and our limitations.” Concurrently, the divine humility
poses a challenge. In Pope Francis’s words, “Do we have the courage to welcome with tenderness the difficulties and problems of those who are near us, or do we prefer impersonal solutions, perhaps
effective but devoid of the warmth of the Gospel?” This and other Gospel events or mysteries are considered by Pope Francis in a way that unlocks their contemporary meaning and challenge in order to “wake up” the Church and society and to encourage Catholics,
Christians, and all people of good will to take a prophetic stance
on key issues such as economic mechanism promoting
unbridled consumerism combined with inequality, the new
idolatry of money, and the environment.

The exhibit, “A Visit with Pope Francis and the Holy Family,” will be on view on the 3rd floor of the John and Maryanne Hennings Post Learning Commons, in the Gerard Manley Hopkins, S.J.,
Special Collections Rooms and Durant Special Collections Lounge,
beginning in early September and running until mid-October.

Over There, the St. Joe Boys are Coming — Saint Joseph’s College and the Great War

The United States did not enter World War I until 1917, but many of the young men from Saint Joseph’s College were ready to serve and make the ultimate sacrifice for their country. This Archives
and Special Collections exhibit relates soeditors of Crimson and Gray in Uniformme of their stories in the words of their contemporaries and letters home from the front. It also examines the brief history of the Student Army Training Corps (S.A.T.C.), the forerunner of today’s Reserve Officer Training Corps (R.O.T.C.) program, when the college was
located at 17th and Stiles Streets
in Philadelphia.

The exhibit is located on the 2nd floor of the Francis A. Drexel Library and will run through January of 2016.

Ron Wendling Booktalk

Wendling 2 (2)WHAT:  Ron Wendling, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of English, will  discuss his recent memoir, Unsuitable Treasure: An Ex-Jesuit Makes Peace With the Past.

WHERE:  Post Learning Commons Wachterhauser Seminar Room

WHEN:  Monday, September 14th at 3:30 PM

All are invited. Light refreshments will be served.

Please plan to join us for what we anticipate will be an engaging presentation and discussion!

 

 

Mademoiselle: Coco Chanel and the Pulse of History — It’s What We’re Reading


September 2015

A monthly offering from Drexel Library’s staff about the books we’ve read.

Mademoiselle: Coco Chanel and the Pulse of History

Mademoiselle: Coco Chanel and the Pulse of HistoryGarelick, Rhonda K.

Until the movie “Coco Before Chanel,” the only thing I knew about Coco Chanel or her products was her name and the perfume Chanel No. 5. But after I saw this film, I found myself intrigued with her rags to riches story and eagerly awaited reading Mademoiselle: Coco Chanel and the Pulse of History to find out more about her.

The other biographies I have read have all been of individuals whose actions were admirable in the way they changed the world. And yet, even with these, there were incidents that showed them in a less favorable light. Reading about Coco Chanel was a different type of biography for me. While Coco did indeed change the world, many of the stories about her show her in a less favorable light than the other individuals I have read about before.

Yet, hers is a fascinating story that describes the incredible talent and vision of one woman who more or less single-handedly created haute couture for women the world over. Not content with status quo, Coco continued to drive herself and others, re-envisioning and re-designing as times and events changed her and the women of the world. She was sought out by the wealthy of both sexes and her lovers were from among the richest of the rich.

For all her flaws, one can’t help but admire trendsetting Coco who set women free from the long skirts and washer-women hairdos of the day to a look that is classic and continues to inspire in 2015. Vogue magazine recently ran a full-page ad for Chanel products. In classic black and white, the head and shoulders photo of a model turned slightly to the side, simply adorned with pearls worn backwards, one of Coco Chanel’s signature looks, spoke volumes of how Chanel continues to be at the forefront of fashion today.

How I wish I had known more about her during my whirlwind weekend in Paris. If I ever get the chance to go there again, I will look up 29 Rue Cambon, as well as 31 Rue Cambon, her apartment.

Mademoiselle: Coco Chanel and the Pulse of History is located in the Popular reading: nonfiction section of the PLC 1st fl.