Library Speaker Series — Laura Crispin, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economics

crispin_photo-1WHAT: Based on her research and expertise, Laura Crispin, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economics, will be presenting “Fight for $15: Pros and Cons of a Minimum Wage Increase”.

WHEN: Wednesday, January 25th 2:00 – 3:00 PM

WHERE: Wachterhauser Seminar Room,
2nd Floor Post Learning Commons

WHO: All are invited! We hope you can join us for what we expect to be a lively and timely discussion.

Light refreshments will be served.

 

Strangers in their own land : anger and mourning on the American right – It’s What We’re Reading


January 2017

“What We’re Reading” is a feature offering periodic reviews from Drexel Library’s staff about the books we’ve read. If you find a book which interests you and it is not in our collection, please feel free to acquire the book through our Interlibrary Loan service.

Strangers in their own land : anger and mourning on the American right

Strangers in their own land : anger and mourning on the American right

Arlie Russell Hochschild.

This month we are highlighting the selection for the SJU Book Club. The club welcomes all members of the SJU community—students, faculty and staff—to participate. The Book Club is a faculty-staff collaborative effort to engage the community in reading and discussing books which explore our social consciousness and personal identity.

The first meeting will take place during free period (11am-12:15 pm) on Tuesday, January 31, 2017, in the Presidents’ Lounge in Campion.

In “Strangers in Their Own Land” Sociologist and UC–Berkeley professor emerita Arlie Russel Hochschild explores parts of the United States that are considered centers of the conservative right. The author interviews a variety of residents of Louisiana such as mayors, salesmen, pastors, truck drivers, plant operators, and many others. She is looking to solve what she describes as the Great Paradox: How can a state that has lower life-expectancy, more divorce, lower school enrollment, environmental pollution, (namely those that could benefit from federal aid) dislike government assistance and regulation?

Hochschild delves into this question by crossing what she calls the “empathy wall.” The author is interested in finding out not only why people have certain beliefs but also listening to the anger and frustration of those who believe they have been forgotten. Hochschild’s results of this five-year study are illuminating in the effort to understand America’s political divide.

Strangers in their own land : anger and mourning on the American right is available at the Front Desk in the Drexel Library as well as electronically.