Tag Archives: exhibits

New Display: Saint Joseph’s College Catalogues and Awards in the Early Years

A new exhibit in Drexel Library entitled “In the Beginning: Saint Joseph’s College Catalogues and Awards of the 1850s,” displays copies from the University Archives and Special Collections of
selected early college catalogues (1852-1862) and academic award certificates along with some photographs of silver medals received by students for their academic success. This collection of items helps tell the story of the College’s inaugural years and sheds some light on what college life would have been like for some of the first
students.

First Premium 3rd Class French John Mullen

Here are a few things to think about while visiting the display:

  • How much would it have cost a parent or guardian to send a
    student to the college during the 1852-1853 academic year?
  • What were some of the classes students had to take in the 1850s as part of their chosen course of study?
  • Do you recognize any of the family names from the 1852-1853 catalogue listing of students or from the awards pages?
  • Would you have been able to follow the regulations for student conduct?

The exhibit is located on the 2nd floor of Drexel Library near the Bridge to the PLC and will be available for viewing through the end of May. Stop by and take a look!

For information on this display, the University Archives or the Gerard Manley Hopkins, S.J. Special Collections, please contact:
Christopher Dixon, Archival Research Librarian
610.660.2164 or “cdixon@sju.edu”

Illuminating the Mission — 7 Days – 7Pages

To commemorate Pope Francis’ visitSt. John's Bible8
to the U.S., the Post Learning Commons and Drexel Library
will be participating in a sharing of the Saint John’s Bible in a unique way.

In solidarity with all those across the country owning the Bible and participating, each day starting
Monday, September 21st and ending on Sunday,
September 27th, a different page of the Bible will be
displayed. For each page of the day, Saint John’s School of Theology has written a reflection incorporating the
artwork and spiritual message conveyed.

For more information see Illuminating the Message on the Saint John’s Bible website.

Over There, the St. Joe Boys are Coming — Saint Joseph’s College and the Great War

The United States did not enter World War I until 1917, but many of the young men from Saint Joseph’s College were ready to serve and make the ultimate sacrifice for their country. This Archives
and Special Collections exhibit relates soeditors of Crimson and Gray in Uniformme of their stories in the words of their contemporaries and letters home from the front. It also examines the brief history of the Student Army Training Corps (S.A.T.C.), the forerunner of today’s Reserve Officer Training Corps (R.O.T.C.) program, when the college was
located at 17th and Stiles Streets
in Philadelphia.

The exhibit is located on the 2nd floor of the Francis A. Drexel Library and will run through January of 2016.

Pavia, Italy — City of Knowledge

Pavia, Italy — City of Knowledge
Currently on Exhibit
Post Learning Commons 3rd Floor

Pavia-Veduta-Aerea-del-Castello-Visconteo

Curated by the Civic Museums of Pavia and presented in partnership with the municipality of Pavia and the Italian Consulate of Philadelphia, this exhibit presents photographs of Pavia from the 19th to the 21st century by six Italian photographers, Fiorenzo Cantalupi, Guglielmo Chiolini, Antonio Manidi, Giuseppe Nazzari , Pierino Sacchi, and Ettore Valli.

Founded by the Romans on the left bank of the Ticino River, Pavia was a center of art and culture for centuries. Several times capital city during the Middle Ages (8th – 13th century), Pavia preserves many historical and material traces of Romanesque and Gothic architecture, including the massive walls that encircle it, splendid churches with richly sculpted façades (San Michele, San Pietro in Ciel d’Oro), and the lofty towers that overlook the palazzi and populate the city skyline. The Visconti family took control of the city in the mid-1300s and built an elegant and richly decorated castle, the characteristic Covered Bridge over the Ticino, the majestic cathedral (designed in part by Leonardo da Vinci) and the Certosa, a masterpiece of Renaissance art. The origins of the university—one of the oldest and most prestigious in Europe– also date to that period (1361). World renowned literati and scientists taught here in the 18th and 19th centuries, from the physicist Alessandro Volta, inventor of the battery, to the poet Ugo Foscolo, the naturalist Lazzaro Splallanzani and the neurologist Camillo Golgi. For the beauty of its monuments and the wealth of its educational tradition, Pavia is known as the “City of Knowledge”.

New Exhibit at the Library

Throughout the month of March, Francis A. Drexel Library will host an exhibit of sample pieces from the 2008 Mordechai Anielewicz Creative Arts Competition. Named for the heroic teenager who organized Jewish resistance and gave his life fighting in the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising of 1943, this annual competition provides students in grades 7-12 in all public, private and parochial schools in Philadelphia and its suburbs, with both a forum and opportunity to respond to the Holocaust by means of creative expression. Panels of judges with expertise in various creative disciplines evaluate the 400 or so submissions. The artistic submissions are mounted and exhibited professionally by the Moore College of Art and Design. All of the winning written submissions are published in a booklet and distributed at the awards ceremony which is held each spring at Moore, in conjunction with the exhibition. For more information, contact Anne Krakow, Associate Director for Public Services and Programming, akrakow@sju.edu or x1906.