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From the President

As I enter the fifth year of my presidency, one certainty that guides my leadership of Saint Joseph’s University is the need for constant innovation and forward thinking. It’s what’s required to remain competitive, to enhance the total student experience effectively, and to develop future leaders — and it’s what Jesuit education is uniquely designed to do.

Across the United States, my colleagues at other colleges and universities are having similar conversations about higher education’s role in shaping society’s future and the importance of innovating academic offerings, campus facilities and co-curricular experiences to engage and prepare the modern student. I am fortunate to have an active role on a number of higher education boards, including the Board of the American Council on Education, the Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities, the Association of Independent Colleges and Universities in Pennsylvania, and the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities. These posts provide me an interesting lens and a great sense of context as I lead this University forward.

As I reflect on the past year of progress at St. Joe’s, I am proud of the work we’re doing and the decisions we’re making: opening a new school to answer a growing need for health care professionals and educators and offering programs that tie into emerging career fields. We have attracted seasoned leaders to fill key roles in academics and administration, and we continue to attract prominent thought leaders and inspiring speakers to campus. Our 20 Division I athletics programs are taking new approaches to supporting and empowering student-athletes. And we have built a comprehensive campus master plan that will transform our future campus — not just meeting, but exceeding, the needs of modern learners. In the pages that follow, you’ll learn more about these highlights, and many more.

I remain confident in the proud tradition of Jesuit education that’s always been at the heart of Hawk Hill. I often think of the words of our 2019 commencement speaker and honorary degree recipient Christopher Gheysens ’05 (MBA), president and CEO of Wawa, Inc., shared with our graduates: “Purpose is permanent. Change is constant.” If we can remain grounded in the things that make us who we are, we can be ever-ready for an exciting future.

SJU President Mark C. Reed Ph.D., MBA
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Mark C. Reed, Ed.D., MBA

President

Leading Through Change

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From left: McDonald, Hargust, McConnell

New Leaders Poised to Carry SJU Forward

As Saint Joseph’s looks to guide a new generation of students to success, President Mark C. Reed, Ed.D., has assembled a leadership team with a strategic mix of professionals who combine the institutional knowledge of long-tenured administrators with the unique voices of new hires. Three new additions to campus leadership offer experienced viewpoints that will advance key areas at the University.

Cheryl A. McConnell, Ph.D., joined Saint Joseph’s as the first provost and vice president for academic affairs to come to the role from outside the University in more than two decades. She brings a wealth of experience in Jesuit education, having served for 30 years in varied leadership roles at Rockhurst University.

Angela McDonald, Ph.D., a licensed family and community counselor and longtime academic leader, was tapped to helm the new School of Health Studies and Education as its inaugural dean. After a decade at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke, she seeks to capitalize on Saint Joseph’s strengths, including the nationally recognized Kinney Center for Autism Education and Support, while growing offerings in a competitive education and health care market.

Zenobia Hargust, an employee relations expert with experience in and outside the world of higher education, assumed the role of chief human resources officer. Hargust, who was most recently director of equal opportunity and employee engagement at Swarthmore College, is responsible for strengthening relationships across Saint Joseph’s and recruiting a diverse pool of top talent for open positions at the University

New Leaders Poised to Carry SJU Forward

As Saint Joseph’s looks to guide a new generation of students to success, President Mark C. Reed, Ed.D., has assembled a leadership team with a strategic mix of professionals who combine the institutional knowledge of long-tenured administrators with the unique voices of new hires. Three new additions to campus leadership offer experienced viewpoints that will advance key areas at the University.

Cheryl A. McConnell, Ph.D., joined Saint Joseph’s as the first provost and vice president for academic affairs to come to the role from outside the University in more than two decades. She brings a wealth of experience in Jesuit education, having served for 30 years in varied leadership roles at Rockhurst University.

Angela McDonald, Ph.D., a licensed family and community counselor and longtime academic leader, was tapped to helm the new School of Health Studies and Education as its inaugural dean. After a decade at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke, she seeks to capitalize on Saint Joseph’s strengths, including the nationally recognized Kinney Center for Autism Education and Support, while growing offerings in a competitive education and health care market.

Zenobia Hargust, an employee relations expert with experience in and outside the world of higher education, assumed the role of chief human resources officer. Hargust, who was most recently director of equal opportunity and employee engagement at Swarthmore College, is responsible for strengthening relationships across Saint Joseph’s and recruiting a diverse pool of top talent for open positions at the University

From left: McDonald, Hargust, McConnell

I’m impressed by the dedication of the faculty and staff who have been serving the education and health-related programs and centers at SJU for years. Because the school was formed from existing programs and centers, the hard work of these faculty and staff, as well as campus leadership before me, has formed a strong foundation on which we can build and expand.

Angela McDonald, Ph.D.

This is a place where people encourage one another to learn more, evolve more, and contribute more for the good of the world. While the University enjoys a strong foundation and reputation, there is never a sense that we’re resting on our laurels. There is more to be done in every corner of campus and I’m excited to be a part of this evolving community.

Zenobia Hargust

Coming from another Jesuit institution, I know the transformational value of an education based in broad thinking and serious inquiry. I’m energized by our dedication to that mission, and to making sure that mission remains at the core of our decisions.

Cheryl A. McConnell, Ph.D.

PREPARING FOR THE FUTURE OF EVERYTHING

An education at Saint Joseph’s, grounded in the liberal arts and the Jesuit tradition of holistic preparation, gives graduates the tools to thrive in their early jobs and the foundation to build new skills as the market changes around them. Saint Joseph’s has taken several steps in the last year that will allow the University to offer its powerful education to students across an even wider range of interests and passions.

An education at Saint Joseph’s, grounded in the liberal arts and the Jesuit tradition of holistic preparation, gives graduates the tools to thrive in their early jobs and the foundation to build new skills as the market changes around them. Saint Joseph’s has taken several steps in the last year that will allow the University to offer its powerful education to students across an even wider range of interests and passions.

New School Answers Call of Opportunity in Two Industries

The School of Health Studies and Education opened in fall 2019, answering a growing need for highly qualified leaders in classrooms and across the health care industry. The school is looking to form immediate and lasting partnerships with practitioners in both fields across the region and is enhancing existing programs to answer immediate needs in the two job markets.

The launch comes at a critical time for both industries. The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that, between 2014 and 2024, 1.9 million jobs will have opened for teachers from preschool to postsecondary education, with the same number of jobs opening in health care occupations.

On the health care side of the school, Saint Joseph’s master’s degree in health education has added a new concentration in health promotion and wellness. The 12-course, 36-credit concentration empowers health leaders to help patients and clients navigate insurance options, basic wellness routines, and other aspects of the complicated systems of care.

SJU’s doctoral program in educational leadership has added a new class that ties the University’s Jesuit mission into coursework. Leadership for Justice, led by experts in the new school, teaches the history and theory needed to critically analyze schools and school leadership practices. It is an important opportunity for reflection, dialogue and analysis intended to produce leaders who are critically conscious and focused on making their schools and communities more just.

New School by the Numbers

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Public, private, parochial and charter schools in the region have an ongoing Saint Joseph’s presence — from student teachers to educators. in ACESJU, a two-year program that places SJU 60 grads in under-resourced Catholic schools

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Undergraduate, graduate and doctoral students across all programs.

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of undergraduate health majors from the Class of 2017 were employed, continuing their education in graduate school or committed to service/military appointments within six months of graduation.

Marketing major Maxwell Morrison ’21 captures the beauty of the Barnes Arboretum during a photography class.

Barnes Partnership Blossoms

In the two years since Saint Joseph’s educational affiliation with the Barnes Foundation was announced, the University has made notable progress on a number of initiatives. The three-year, non-credit Barnes Horticultural Certificate Program was officially added to Saint Joseph’s course roster in Fall 2019. The program takes a comprehensive approach to horticultural science and prepares students and graduates to sit for the Pennsylvania Certified Horticulturist exam. The Barnes Arboretum was certified by Botanic Garden Conservation International, confirming its adherence to the highest international standards

Barnes Partnership Blossoms

In the two years since Saint Joseph’s educational affiliation with the Barnes Foundation was announced, the University has made notable progress on a number of initiatives. The three-year, non-credit Barnes Horticultural Certificate Program was officially added to Saint Joseph’s course roster in Fall 2019. The program takes a comprehensive approach to horticultural science and prepares students and graduates to sit for the Pennsylvania Certified Horticulturist exam. The Barnes Arboretum was certified by Botanic Garden Conservation International, confirming its adherence to the highest international standards

Marketing major Maxwell Morrison ’21 captures the beauty of the Barnes Arboretum during a photography class.

Nicolas Schoppe ’22 (left) and Greg Fernandes ’21

New Programs Highlight Innovation

The University is offering innovative programs, faculty-student mentorship and real-world learning experiences in order to equip students with the skills and confidence they need to respond to an ever-changing future and find personal fulfillment, including:

College of Arts and Sciences

  • A fully online master’s in cybersecurity provides students with the opportunity to understand the most recent information technologies to prevent cyber-attacks.
  • Five-year combined B.S. + M.S. in computer science is designed to encourage promising undergraduates to pursue computer science graduate studies at Saint Joseph’s.

Haub School of Business

  • A sales certificate to ready students to excel after graduation is open to students majoring in food marketing, pharmaceutical and health care marketing, real estate finance and risk management and insurance with an interest in learning and practicing selling their ideas for their business propositions. 
  • Bloomberg Certification for finance majors identifies recipients as advanced users of the Bloomberg Terminal, one of the most powerful tools in the financial world. In January 2019, the Haub School was recognized by Bloomberg as an Experiential Learning Partner.

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earned in research and support grants during the 2018-19 academic year

New Programs Highlight Innovation

The University is offering innovative programs, faculty-student mentorship and real-world learning experiences in order to equip students with the skills and confidence they need to respond to an ever-changing future and find personal fulfillment, including:

College of Arts and Sciences

  • A fully online master’s in cybersecurity provides students with the opportunity to understand the most recent information technologies to prevent cyber-attacks.
  • Five-year combined B.S. + M.S. in computer science is designed to encourage promising undergraduates to pursue computer science graduate studies at Saint Joseph’s.

Haub School of Business

  • A sales certificate to ready students to excel after graduation is open to students majoring in food marketing, pharmaceutical and health care marketing, real estate finance and risk management and insurance with an interest in learning and practicing selling their ideas for their business propositions. 
  • Bloomberg Certification for finance majors identifies recipients as advanced users of the Bloomberg Terminal, one of the most powerful tools in the financial world. In January 2019, the Haub School was recognized by Bloomberg as an Experiential Learning Partner.

Nicolas Schoppe ’22 (left) and Greg Fernandes ’21

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earned in research and support grants during the 2018-19 academic year

The Kinney Center’s job training helps clients like Ira Tucker, seen here on a dog walking assignment, find rewarding work.

Kinney Center Expands Research Focus in Second Decade

In October 2019, the Kinney Center for Autism Education and Support celebrated the 10th anniversary of its official opening. For a decade, the Center has been a trailblazer in autism awareness and student success, offering unique programming to support individuals and families affected by autism and giving future autism educators hands-on experience working in the field.

If the Center’s first decade was about preparing individuals with autism and their teachers for the world, its second decade will focus on preparing the world for people with autism. Using research and practical solutions, Saint Joseph’s hopes to create models for autism accessibility across industries.

Among Kinney’s recent accomplishments:

  • The University became one of the first higher education institutions to offer an Autism Break Room in an NCAA Division I athletic arena, opening the space in Hagan Arena in December 2018.
  • Strengthening the Center’s research arm, Joseph McCleery, Ph.D., executive director of academic programs, recently led a study that explored how a high-tech app can improve social and communication skills in children with autism.
  • McCleery also worked with researchers at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia to develop virtual reality training to help individuals with autism and police learn the best ways to interact with one another.

Kinney Center Expands Research Focus in Second Decade

In October 2019, the Kinney Center for Autism Education and Support celebrated the 10th anniversary of its official opening. For a decade, the Center has been a trailblazer in autism awareness and student success, offering unique programming to support individuals and families affected by autism and giving future autism educators hands-on experience working in the field.

If the Center’s first decade was about preparing individuals with autism and their teachers for the world, its second decade will focus on preparing the world for people with autism. Using research and practical solutions, Saint Joseph’s hopes to create models for autism accessibility across industries.

Among Kinney’s recent accomplishments:

  • The University became one of the first higher education institutions to offer an Autism Break Room in an NCAA Division I athletic arena, opening the space in Hagan Arena in December 2018.
  • Strengthening the Center’s research arm, Joseph McCleery, Ph.D., executive director of academic programs, recently led a study that explored how a high-tech app can improve social and communication skills in children with autism.
  • McCleery also worked with researchers at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia to develop virtual reality training to help individuals with autism and police learn the best ways to interact with one another.

The Kinney Center’s job training helps clients like Ira Tucker, seen here on a dog walking assignment, find rewarding work.

GROWING AND ADVANCING

A proposed expansion and renovation to O’Pake Recreation Center will give Hawks a state-of-the-art facility to be active participants in their health and wellness.

A Campus Master Plan to Help Build Our Future

When Felix Barbelin, S.J., pastor of Old St. Joseph’s Church, looked at the landscape of education in Philadelphia in the mid-1800s, he saw a need for the city’s 100,000- plus Catholics to continue learning beyond elementary school. He arranged for the purchase of two buildings on Willings Alley and expanded the existing clergy house there to accommodate a college.

More than a century and a half later, Saint Joseph’s continues to search for ways to grow, both physically and in the impact it can make on young minds in Philadelphia and beyond. A new campus master plan, unveiled in spring 2019, presents a bold vision for the future of Saint Joseph’s campus on City Avenue, carefully crafted to maximize and modernize the University’s facilities and meet the evolving needs of today’s students.

“Higher education is one of the most important investments a family can make, and if we’re going to ask people to make that investment with us, we need to ensure that we’re offering students the best,” says Mark C. Reed, Ed.D., president of Saint Joseph’s. “This plan, when fully realized, will feature best-in-class spaces for learning, living, and interacting.”

“This plan, when fully realized, will feature best-in-class spaces for learning, living, and interacting.”
Mark C. Reed, Ed.D., MBA

Among the plan’s goals are modernized gathering spaces throughout the University’s footprint and adding new hubs of innovation for student and faculty research. The plan will also more formally link the Philadelphia and Merion campuses, creating a more cohesive, walkable Hawk Hill.

For more: sju.edu/masterplan

Enrollment Trends Show Improved Academic Quality and Selectivity

For the fifth straight year, Saint Joseph’s recorded progress in the academic quality and selectivity in its incoming class. This progress is the result of a dedicated effort by the Office of Enrollment Management to recruit, accept and admit students who will excel at Saint Joseph’s and go on to success in their professional careers and personal endeavors.

The Class of 2023 includes 1,103 selected from an applicant pool representing 42 states and 38 countries. They carry an average high school GPA of 3.66 and average SAT scores of 1221 on the 1600-point scale. Of admitted students, 92 percent completed honors or advanced placement courses in high school. Students of color comprise 20.4 percent of the class, and seven percent of incoming students attended a Jesuit high school.

“Our goal is to recruit a class that will challenge themselves, each other and the classes that follow to reshape the future of Saint Joseph’s and the many industries they go on to lead,” explains Karen Pellegrino, vice president for enrollment management.

“Our goal is to recruit a class that will challenge themselves, each other and the classes that follow to reshape the future of Saint Joseph’s and the many industries they go on to lead.”
Karen Pellegrino

Notably, Saint Joseph’s has raised the standard for incoming students while continuing to make its education available to populations who might not otherwise have considered college: 14.9 percent of the Class of 2019 are first generation students and 13.1 percent are recipients of Pell Grants, which are awarded to students who demonstrate exceptional financial need

Enrollment

Trends

Over the past five years, SJU has marked a steady increase in indicators of academic quality and selectivity among its incoming classes.

Acceptance Rate

  • Class of 2019

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  • Class of 2023

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Students of Color

  • Class of 2019

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Average SAT

Class of 2019

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Class of 2023

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Average High School GPA

Class of 2019

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Class of 2023

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Living the Mission

Yearlong Reflection Reveals Strength of Mission Commitment

Over the past several years, Jesuit institutions around the world, at the request of the Superior General of the Society of Jesus, have undertaken yearlong self-studies to reflect on how well, as individuals and as a community, they live out core Ignatian values. Saint Joseph’s completed its Mission Priority Examen in Spring 2019, after a year of surveys, open forums and roundtables with more than a dozen key constituent groups on campus. A peer review team of staff from other Jesuit institutions found several key strengths in Saint Joseph’s mission, including:

  • University leadership’s knowledge of and commitment to the mission. A significant percentage of the University Leadership Council has completed the Ignatian Colleagues Program, a national program designed to educate and form administrators and faculty more deeply in the Jesuit tradition.
  • The incorporation of Jesuit values into academic pursuits, specifically in the work of the Institute for Jewish-Catholic Relations (IJCR) and the Kinney Center for Autism Education and Support.
  • The prominent part that Campus Ministry plays in life on Hawk Hill.
  • The talent, dedication and influence of the Jesuit community.
  • The University’s role in the Catholic Church at large in the area. Of note, it is estimated that more than 2,000 SJU alumni serve as teachers, administrators and leaders in local Catholic schools.

“Self-examination is one of the most important tools in Ignatian spirituality. By pausing to note our achievements and by seeking to be greater in other areas, we engage more deeply with our mission. The Mission Priority Examen was a crucial opportunity for us to do this with every aspect of our University community.”
Daniel Joyce, S.J. ’88
Executive Director of Mission Programs

 

For more Information, go to: sju.edu/news/missionpriority

Yearlong Reflection Reveals Strength of Mission Commitment

Over the past several years, Jesuit institutions around the world, at the request of the Superior General of the Society of Jesus, have undertaken yearlong self-studies to reflect on how well, as individuals and as a community, they live out core Ignatian values. Saint Joseph’s completed its Mission Priority Examen in Spring 2019, after a year of surveys, open forums and roundtables with more than a dozen key constituent groups on campus. A peer review team of staff from other Jesuit institutions found several key strengths in Saint Joseph’s mission, including:

  • University leadership’s knowledge of and commitment to the mission. A significant percentage of the University Leadership Council has completed the Ignatian Colleagues Program, a national program designed to educate and form administrators and faculty more deeply in the Jesuit tradition.
  • The incorporation of Jesuit values into academic pursuits, specifically in the work of the Institute for Jewish-Catholic Relations (IJCR) and the Kinney Center for Autism Education and Support.
  • The prominent part that Campus Ministry plays in life on Hawk Hill.
  • The talent, dedication and influence of the Jesuit community.
  • The University’s role in the Catholic Church at large in the area. Of note, it is estimated that more than 2,000 SJU alumni serve as teachers, administrators and leaders in local Catholic schools.

“Self-examination is one of the most important tools in Ignatian spirituality. By pausing to note our achievements and by seeking to be greater in other areas, we engage more deeply with our mission. The Mission Priority Examen was a crucial opportunity for us to do this with every aspect of our University community.”
Daniel Joyce, S.J. ’88
Executive Director of Mission Programs

 

For more Information, go to: sju.edu/news/missionpriority

Program Deepens Campus Leaders’ Connection to Jesuit Roots

For the past 10 years, administrators and faculty from Jesuit colleges and universities around the country have participated in the Ignatian Colleagues Program, a series of experiences designed to deepen one’s connection to the Jesuit and Catholic tradition of higher education. University President Mark C. Reed, Ed.D., was part of the first cohort of participants when he was vice president for administration and student affairs at Fairfield University. More than a dozen other campus leaders have completed or enrolled in the program, including three in the current cohort: College of Arts and Sciences Dean Shaily Menon, Ph.D.; Director of Undergraduate Enrollment Maureen Mathis; and Associate Vice President of University Advancement Marty Farrell ’88, ’98 M.S. “

I’ve been steeped in all things Jesuit and Ignatian since my undergraduate days,” Farrell says. “But I’m very grateful for the opportunity to immerse myself in this program at this stage of my life, both as a long-term employee of SJU and also as a parent to children who have experienced a Jesuit education.”

“I’m very grateful for the opportunity to immerse myself in this program at this stage of my life.”
Marty Farrell ’88, ’98 M.S.

As part of the program, each participant is asked to take on a work-related project based on what they are learning. Menon hopes to design a project that will incorporate Ignatian pedagogy for sustainability in SJU coursework.

“Earlier this year, I attended a workshop with colleagues from several Jesuit universities who had incorporated the pedagogy and found their work inspirational,” Menon said. “Taking on this project would align with my academic interests, and a renewed focus on sustainability at SJU would tie in with one of the Jesuits’ Universal Apostolic Preferences, ‘Caring for our Common Home.’”

College of Arts and Sciences Dean Shaily Menon, Ph.D., and Marty Farrell ’88, ’98 (M.S.), associate vice president for University Advancement, are current participants in the Ignatian Colleagues Program.

College of Arts and Sciences Dean Shaily Menon, Ph.D., and Marty Farrell ’88, ’98 (M.S.), associate vice president for University Advancement, are current participants in the Ignatian Colleagues Program.

Program Deepens Campus Leaders’ Connection to Jesuit Roots

For the past 10 years, administrators and faculty from Jesuit colleges and universities around the country have participated in the Ignatian Colleagues Program, a series of experiences designed to deepen one’s connection to the Jesuit and Catholic tradition of higher education. University President Mark C. Reed, Ed.D., was part of the first cohort of participants when he was vice president for administration and student affairs at Fairfield University. More than a dozen other campus leaders have completed or enrolled in the program, including three in the current cohort: College of Arts and Sciences Dean Shaily Menon, Ph.D.; Director of Undergraduate Enrollment Maureen Mathis; and Associate Vice President of University Advancement Marty Farrell ’88, ’98 M.S. “

I’ve been steeped in all things Jesuit and Ignatian since my undergraduate days,” Farrell says. “But I’m very grateful for the opportunity to immerse myself in this program at this stage of my life, both as a long-term employee of SJU and also as a parent to children who have experienced a Jesuit education.”

“I’m very grateful for the opportunity to immerse myself in this program at this stage of my life.”
Marty Farrell ’88, ’98 M.S.

As part of the program, each participant is asked to take on a work-related project based on what they are learning. Menon hopes to design a project that will incorporate Ignatian pedagogy for sustainability in SJU coursework.

“Earlier this year, I attended a workshop with colleagues from several Jesuit universities who had incorporated the pedagogy and found their work inspirational,” Menon said. “Taking on this project would align with my academic interests, and a renewed focus on sustainability at SJU would tie in with one of the Jesuits’ Universal Apostolic Preferences, ‘Caring for our Common Home.’”

Commitments and Action in Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Reinforce Mission

In the pursuit of creating a campus that reflects the rich diversity in the world around us, Saint Joseph’s is guided by its mission and its strategic plan to create a welcoming environment for students, faculty and staff. Our Jesuit educational philosophy emphasizes a respect for all humanity and an appreciation of varying points of view, which makes us stronger as a community and an institution.

In the last year, University faculty, staff, students and leadership worked to enhance diversity and inclusion across all areas of the community. Notably, Saint Joseph’s commissioned a comprehensive climate study and developed an initial Inclusive Excellence Blueprint and a racial bias action plan. The Office of Inclusion and Diversity augmented its programming in 2018 and 2019, offering Factuality, a facilitated dialogue and board game for the campus community to simulate diverse experiences in America, and LINES, a series of monologues presented during Welcome Weekend that are inspired by real student experiences dealing with issues of identity, multiculturalism, diversity and inclusion. Complementing this work, the student government spearheaded a #BeCivil campaign to advance productive dialogue and education on campus.

In addition, the University set clear strategic initiatives for 2019-2020; continued to diversify its leadership team; improved student life training and bias reporting protocols; expanded embedded programs for all incoming students and faculty; and enhanced professional development opportunities for faculty to create more inclusive classrooms and pedagogical practices.

Commitments and Action in Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Reinforce Mission

In the pursuit of creating a campus that reflects the rich diversity in the world around us, Saint Joseph’s is guided by its mission and its strategic plan to create a welcoming environment for students, faculty and staff. Our Jesuit educational philosophy emphasizes a respect for all humanity and an appreciation of varying points of view, which makes us stronger as a community and an institution.

In the last year, University faculty, staff, students and leadership worked to enhance diversity and inclusion across all areas of the community. Notably, Saint Joseph’s commissioned a comprehensive climate study and developed an initial Inclusive Excellence Blueprint and a racial bias action plan. The Office of Inclusion and Diversity augmented its programming in 2018 and 2019, offering Factuality, a facilitated dialogue and board game for the campus community to simulate diverse experiences in America, and LINES, a series of monologues presented during Welcome Weekend that are inspired by real student experiences dealing with issues of identity, multiculturalism, diversity and inclusion. Complementing this work, the student government spearheaded a #BeCivil campaign to advance productive dialogue and education on campus.

In addition, the University set clear strategic initiatives for 2019-2020; continued to diversify its leadership team; improved student life training and bias reporting protocols; expanded embedded programs for all incoming students and faculty; and enhanced professional development opportunities for faculty to create more inclusive classrooms and pedagogical practices.

National Experts Bring Diverse Viewpoints to Campus

While a good portion of the Saint Joseph’s educational experience takes place in the classroom, students learn on a daily basis through internships and in co-ops, immersing themselves in the community and hearing from prominent guests to campus. This past year, students, faculty and staff learned from thought leaders on a variety of diverse topics.

  • Condoleezza Rice, Ph.D., former secretary of state, shared thoughts on the importance of international partnerships and finding common ground in American politics.
  • James Martin, S.J., author and editor-at-large for America magazine, called for outreach to marginalized Catholics, particularly those in the LGBTQ+ community.
  • Bishop Edward K. Braxton of the Diocese of Belleville, Illinois, spoke on the legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr., and the importance of continued efforts for equity.
  • Andrew Gillum, former Tallahassee mayor, advocated for voter rights and making daily progress for inclusion and diversity
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“We have a problem, and it seems exacerbated by the fact that the common American narrative — it doesn’t matter where you came from or how — is being replaced by the politics of grievance.”

Condoleezza Rice

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“Notice how Jesus treated people on the margins. He listens to and treats [them] with compassion and dignity. There are two places to stand when it comes to ministry to excluded groups. You can stand with the crowd, or you can stand with Jesus.”

 Fr. Jim Martin

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“[Dr. King] would see the division and polarizations, and he would wonder if conversations were possible to bridge this division.”

 Bishop Edward K. Braxton

Photo by Jul Hankinson ‘19 / The Hawk

sju-andrew-gillum

“I believe each one of us is born to do a particular thing, at a particular time, in a particular way. Those are the things we’re willing to get knocked down for and get back up.”

Andrew Gillum

Photo by Mitchell Shields ‘22 / The Hawk

APEX Documentary Earns Recognition at Film Festivals

APEX: The Appalachian Experience is now an award-winning documentary. The SJU film received accolades and made the rounds at a number of local and national film festivals in the fall of 2019.

Building A Modern Era of Athletics

An number of new hires and initiatives are setting Saint Joseph’s 20 Division I athletics teams up for success in the increasingly competitive, analytical and student driven world of sports.

New Hires, Roles Mark Progress

New men’s head basketball coach Billy Lange joined the Hawks in March 2019, bringing more than two decades of experience coaching on the collegiate and pro levels. He most recently served as an assistant with the Philadelphia 76ers and was head coach for the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy and Navy. Lange will put forth a dynamic and progressive agenda to further establish Saint Joseph’s as a program with prominence on the national stage. To help him achieve his vision, Lange built a team of assistants and support staff with a mix of institutional connections and local and regional cachet.

Lange anchors a team of experienced professionals from across the sports industry who have come to Hawk Hill over the last year, from organizations including the Houston Rockets, Bucknell University, the University of Notre Dame and others. A number of long-serving athletics administrators were also elevated to new roles to support the momentum.

“Each individual who interacts with a student-athlete should have the goal of helping them realize their greatest athletic and personal potential.”
Jill Bodensteiner

“Each individual who interacts with a student-athlete should have the goal of helping them realize their greatest athletic and personal potential.” says Jill Bodensteiner, director of athletics. “We must give them every opportunity to prepare themselves for success in their lives beyond their final games on Hawk Hill.”

Photo: Sideline Photos LLC

New Hires, Roles Mark Progress

New men’s head basketball coach Billy Lange joined the Hawks in March 2019, bringing more than two decades of experience coaching on the collegiate and pro levels. He most recently served as an assistant with the Philadelphia 76ers and was head coach for the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy and Navy. Lange will put forth a dynamic and progressive agenda to further establish Saint Joseph’s as a program with prominence on the national stage. To help him achieve his vision, Lange built a team of assistants and support staff with a mix of institutional connections and local and regional cachet.

Lange anchors a team of experienced professionals from across the sports industry who have come to Hawk Hill over the last year, from organizations including the Houston Rockets, Bucknell University, the University of Notre Dame and others. A number of long-serving athletics administrators were also elevated to new roles to support the momentum.

“Each individual who interacts with a student-athlete should have the goal of helping them realize their greatest athletic and personal potential.”
Jill Bodensteiner

“Each individual who interacts with a student-athlete should have the goal of helping them realize their greatest athletic and personal potential.” says Jill Bodensteiner, director of athletics. “We must give them every opportunity to prepare themselves for success in their lives beyond their final games on Hawk Hill.”

Photo: Sideline Photos LLC

New Group Adds Focus on Mental Health

Eric Laudano, SJU’s new senior associate athletics director for high performance, is evolving the way that Hawks prepare for competition. From individualized strength training to a cutting edge sports science system that uses artificial intelligence to predict and help prevent injuries, Saint Joseph’s student-athletes are given the tools to ensure that their bodies are in top shape. But a new program is ensuring that they are as well prepared mentally as they are physically. Under Laudano’s stewardship and led by women’s track and field senior captain Caroline Duffy, Hawk-Minded is a student-athlete peer support group founded to break down barriers and have open conversations about mental health. The group meets monthly and talks about issues, providing struggling peers with support and directing them to resources, including SJU’s Counseling and Psychological Services team, who offer guidance.“ Because the meetings are for students only, our peers can hopefully feel like they can share openly,” Duffy says. “Mental health is, in a way, taboo to talk about, which is exactly what this group wants to avoid.”

Hastie ‘22

While most of the world’s decisions are motivated by the bottom line, the formation of this committee exemplifies SJU Athletics’ commitment to creating the best student-athlete experience possible. Each member of the committee truly has a voice in the decisions that affect the daily lives of all student-athletes on Hawk Hill.

Bobby Hastie ’22

Athletics Steering Committee

Hastie ‘22

New Group Adds Focus on Mental Health

Eric Laudano, SJU’s new senior associate athletics director for high performance, is evolving the way that Hawks prepare for competition. From individualized strength training to a cutting edge sports science system that uses artificial intelligence to predict and help prevent injuries, Saint Joseph’s student-athletes are given the tools to ensure that their bodies are in top shape. But a new program is ensuring that they are as well prepared mentally as they are physically. Under Laudano’s stewardship and led by women’s track and field senior captain Caroline Duffy, Hawk-Minded is a student-athlete peer support group founded to break down barriers and have open conversations about mental health. The group meets monthly and talks about issues, providing struggling peers with support and directing them to resources, including SJU’s Counseling and Psychological Services team, who offer guidance.“ Because the meetings are for students only, our peers can hopefully feel like they can share openly,” Duffy says. “Mental health is, in a way, taboo to talk about, which is exactly what this group wants to avoid.”

While most of the world’s decisions are motivated by the bottom line, the formation of this committee exemplifies SJU Athletics’ commitment to creating the best student-athlete experience possible. Each member of the committee truly has a voice in the decisions that affect the daily lives of all student-athletes on Hawk Hill.

Bobby Hastie ’22

Athletics Steering Committee

Programs Amplify Voice of Student-Athletes

Saint Joseph’s has kickstarted several programs in the past year that give student-athletes a prominent role in their own development and the growth of the Hawks’ athletics program overall.

  • 53 coach-nominated students participated in a Leadership Academy in the first half of 2019, attending several presentations focused on personal growth, career preparation, leadership, and faith and spirituality.
  • 15 incoming student-athletes participated in Taking Flight, a program that introduces them to Hawk Hill’s support network of faculty, staff and coaches. In addition to getting a jump start on training, participants took a three-credit course that showed how sports can trigger social change.
  • 20 representatives— one from each varsity team — sit on the Student-Athlete Advisory Committee, an NCAA-wide initiative that gives students a voice in proposed NCAA legislation and encourages participants to become campus leaders, arranging community service and special events for their classmates
  • 11 student-athletes, two coaches and two administrators form the Athletics Steering Committee, which meets two to three times a semester to advise on key departmental decisions, including team apparel and other policies.

0%

Graduation success rate for student-athletes in academic year 2018-2019, well above the national NCAA average.

Major Moments in Athletics

  1. Field Hockey claimed its third consecutive Atlantic 10 title.
  2. Golfer Michael O’Brien ’20 (left, with head coach Bob Lynch) captured medalist honors at the ODU/OBX Intercollegiate after shooting a course-record 61 (-10) in the final round.
  3. Captain Zach Michon ‘20 won the individual title as the Saint Joseph’s men’s cross country squad took home a second-place team finish at the 2019 Atlantic 10 Cross Country Championship.
  4. Defender David Grana ‘21 earned multiple Academic All-American honors, setting a record in the 62-year program history of men’s soccer.

Photo Credit: 1) Brian McWalters/Atlantic 10 2) Kristen O’Brien 3) Tom Connelly 4) Sideline Photos LLC

strengthening our future

As stated in the strategic plan, Thinking Anew, Acting Anew, the University seeks to advance its mission by steadily strengthening its financial capacity. In fact, Saint Joseph’s forward-looking approach to strategic, financial and operational planning has put the institution on solid financial footing and provided the flexibility needed to respond to market realities and emerging opportunities for growth and investment.

Underscoring this point, Standard & Poor’s once again reaffirmed Saint Joseph’s strong financial position with an A- rating with a Stable Outlook. This is significant at a time when the higher education industry has earned mixed outlooks from major ratings agencies.

The University continues to take proactive steps to diversify revenue sources, placing a much sharper focus on growing non-tuition revenue through innovation and rethinking the use of campus properties. In particular, enhanced efforts have been made to drive revenue through sponsorships, hosting outside events and conferences, and increasing philanthropy through major gifts and the Annual Fund.

Understanding the power of the endowment for tuition-dependent institutions like SJU, a recent strategy for growth is yielding substantial results. Over a two-year period, the University’s endowment dollars per student increased from $36,210 to $45,664. The overall endowment sits at just over $300 million.

The University continues to reallocate funds to support investments in areas of strategic importance. In fiscal year 2020, $4 million has been targeted for investments in the new School of Health Studies and Education and infrastructure to support the capital campaign and funds to support design work for campus master plan projects. These investments advance the University’s goals of curricular innovation and modernization of campus facilities.

Finally, the University’s financial health drives economic impact in the region. The Association of Independent Colleges and Universities released the results of a comprehensive study on the economic impact of the state’s higher education entities for 2018. Saint Joseph’s impact on the Pennsylvania economy is estimated at $403.8 million in revenue, creating 3,246 jobs and $19.1 million in tax revenues.

Saint Joseph's University hawk shadow in red

FY19 Operating Revenue

  • Student Income

    0%
  • Endowment and Other Releases

    0%
  • Other Income

    0%
  • Unrestricted Gifts

    0%
  • Grants

    0%

FY19 Operating Expenses

  • Employee Compensation

    0%
  • Financial Aid

    0%
  • Purchased Goods and Services

    0%
  • Strategic Initiatives

    0%
  • Depreciation

    0%
  • Interest

    0%
Saint Joseph's University hawk shadow in red

FY19 Endowments Net Assets

As of May 31, 2019 (in millions) by Designation

2015

$0

2016

$0

2017

$0

2018

$0

2019

$0

FY19 Balance Sheet

As of May 31, 2019 (in millions)

Assets
Cash and Short-Term Investments $82.5 $71.5
Accounts Receivable, Net 28.3 40.4
Long-Term Investments 295.5 289.3
Property, Plant and Equipment 399.7 403.8
Other Assests* 4.0 4.9
Total Assets $810.0 $809.9
Liabilities
Accounts Payable and Accrued Expenses $25.9 $26.7
Deferred Revenue 15.8 16.5
Long-Term Debt 216.5 222.2
Other Liabilities** 1.4 2.7
Total Liabilities $259.6 $268.1
Net Assets $550.4 $541.8
* Other assets include prepaid expenses and student loans receivables.
**Other Liabilities include student deposits and advances from government for student loans.

University Profile

Founded by the Society of Jesus in

1851

Campus in Philadelphia and
Montgomery County

125-acre

Alumni worldwide

72,000+

Total Enrollment

7,362

(61.6% undergraduate day)

Academic Programs

55 undergraduate day majors
78 minors
20 degree completion and certificate programs, including online options
55 graduate programs

65%

of the Class of 2019 held a double major or minor

87%

of 2019 graduates participated in an internship, co-op or other experiential learning

92%

of business co-op students reported that the co-op helped them to be selected for more competitive job postings

Top 10

in U.S. News & World Report’s rankings of Best Regional Universities, North

University report staff

Chief Marketing and
Communications Officer

Marie Williams

Editors

Jeffrey Martin ’04, ’05 (M.A.)
Kelly Welsh ’05 (M.A.)

Design

Ian W. Riley

Photography

Melissa Kelly ’13 (M.A.)