Phishing Scam: Dropbox Share Requests Now Being Faked

According to Wikipedia, Phishing “is the attempt to acquire sensitive information such as usernames, passwords, and credit card details (and sometimes, indirectly, money) by masquerading as a trustworthy entity in an electronic communication.

Communications purporting to be from popular social web sites, auction sites, banks, online payment processors or IT administrators are commonly used to lure unsuspecting public. Phishing emails may contain links to websites that are infected with malware. Phishing is typically carried out by email spoofing or instant messaging, and it often directs users to enter details at a fake website whose look and feel are almost identical to the legitimate one.”

It has come to our attention that Dropbox share requests are now being forged. Here are two examples of the fake share requests people have been receiving:

Hi asantabarbara@siena.edu,

=

Your friend shared a folder with you on Dropbox

=

Click accept to view

=

Happy sharing!

_____________________________________________________________________

Hello,

John Smith shared a folder with you on Dropbox

Click accept<http://nationalcenterforscience{dot}org/cuchicagoEdu> to view

Happy sharing!

– The Dropbox Team

 

Please note: if you receive a Dropbox share request from an unknown e-mail, delete the share request immediately and do not click on the link.

If you receive a Dropbox share request from someone you know, do not click on the link. Instead, send a new e-mail (don’t respond by replying to the Dropbox request) to the person asking them if they sent the share request. If they did, you may click on the link. If they didn’t, delete the share request and do not click on the link.

If you have any questions, please contact the TSC at X2920 or by e-mail at techhelp@sju.edu.