Throughout the spring semester we will be hosting a variety of events, displays and workshops. The charts to the left list each one along with their respective dates and times. There is a symbol to designate each category: an eye for displays, a coffee cup for events and a pile of books for workshops.

The workshops are largely for students — pass the word!

Stop by throughout the semester and browse one or more of the displays.

For the events, mark your calendar and plan to join us.
Light refreshments.

 

 

 

Throughout the first floor of Drexel Library are ten displays highlighting female artists.  This exhibition is a collaboration between Dr. Martha Easton’s Art 107 course, Kathleen Vaccaro’s Art 133 course, SJU art librarian Jenifer Baldwin, and SJU Gallery Director, Jeanne Bracy.  In order to raise awareness of the work of women artists, and provide more inclusive representation of these artists in the library’s book collection, SJU students created the book displays, accompanying essays, and portraits.

ART 107: Women, Gender, and Art
Dr. Martha Easton and Jenifer Baldwin, SJU’s librarian for art, collaborated on developing the assignment in which students selected the books and researched and wrote essays providing context for the artists’ lives and work.

ART 133: Drawing 1
To celebrate and understand the work of a variety of women artists on a deeper level, students in Kathleen Vaccaro’s Drawing I course researched the lives and work of the artists and created a portrait inspired by that artist and her artwork.

Nan Goldin
The Artist and the LGBTQIA Community
Photo Credit
Book Selections and Essay
Carly Rybinski, Lilly McCann, Josie Clark

Frida Kahlo
Self-Exposed in Exposés
Portraits
Andrew Rhoades
Book Selections and Essay
Lauren Cavanaugh, Gregory Anderson, Kaitlyn Patterson

 

Georgia O’Keeffe
Creating Art for Herself
Portraits
Timothy Wolff, Donald Maloney
Book Selections and Essay
Erin Duffy, Veronica Wilson, Hannah Delfaco-Losa

Faith Ringgold
Fighting Discrimination with Quilts
Photo Credit
Queen’s University
Book Selections and Essay
Maria Bio, Emily Crawford, Aaron Shafer

Käthe Kollwitz
An Artist for Social Justice
Portraits
Alex Gomes, Yaonan Zeng
Book Selections and Essay
Emily Bendock, Sophia Dell’Arciprete, Natalie Nguyen

Barbara Kruger
Her Impact on Contemporary American Art
Portraits
Haley Fusar
Book Selections and Essay
Maddie DeMarco, Michelle McCann, and Mia Porter


Yayoi Kusama
“The Princess of Polka Dots”
Portraits
Olivia Amwake, Janine Dempster
Book Selections and Essay
Lauren Catalano, Gianna Darreff, Will Egbert

 

Cindy Sherman
Female Self-Portraiture and the Power of the Self

Portraits
Zicong Deng, T.J. Dewitt
Book Selections and Essay
Lauren Hawkins, Jayne Baran, Peyton Drift

Jenny Saville, Lucian Freud, Alice Neel
The Unconventional Female Nude
Portrait
Erin Mongeluzi, Austin Strazzulla
Book Selections and Essay
Jancarla Herrera, Juliana Magriples, Anna Keppel

Elisabeth Vigee-Lebrun, Adelaide Labille-Guiard
Beating the Odds: Art Career, the Academy, and Family
Portrait
Erin Sweeney
Book Selections and Essay
Emma McCormick, Sarah Waro, and Gabriella Youshock

 

While some of the book cover images have been included above, pictured below is a sampling of the student art in “Focus on Women & Art”.

A reception for the exhibit will be held in the library on Tuesday, February 4th during Free Period. The students, faculty and art librarian will be on hand to discuss this interesting collaboration and answer questions you may have about the process and outcomes.

“Focus on Women & Art” will be up throughout the spring semester.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Need a space to work on your paper? Need a block of uninterrupted time for writing? Have any last minute questions?

Reference Librarians will be on hand for last minute assistance you may need.

Don’t be shy — stop by! There MIGHT be snacks!

Tuesday, November 19th
6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Drexel Library
Instruction Lab, 1st floor

A recent chance to re-organize the SJU Archive helped us to organize and label all archival boxes, create a box list and then compose a current finding aid. The Saint Joseph’s University Archives Finding Aid provides an inventory and description of the institutional and organizational records of Saint Joseph’s University dating from 1851-2019.  Records include photographs, correspondence, documents, memorabilia, scrapbooks and yearbooks which document the history of the administrative and academic units and activities of SJU’s administration, faculty, staff and students.

Our Finding Aid gives a context for our collection, which includes University history and Catholic, Jesuit, and local history. Reading the finding aid allows researchers to decide whether our materials can help them in their research. Related materials are also listed.

You can access the Finding Aid from the library homepage under Archives and Special Collections.

-Lesley Carey, Library Technician – Archives and Special Collections

Many changes in the Post Learning Commons and Drexel Library over the summer! One that we are excited to share with you is a new way for SJU students to meet with reference librarians for personalized, in-depth support for coursework.

We can help with formulating and refining topics; searching for and locating relevant, credible sources including articles, books, data, images, and more; and organizing and citing sources. Getting to know a librarian can provide ongoing support throughout your time at the University.  To set up a meeting with a librarian, either complete this form, or make an appointment through Starfish on the student portal.
You can find us in Drexel Library, Rm. 122.

 

As we celebrate Google‘s 20th birthday today, let’s take a look at how Google has impacted research in the library. Google is a tool that has some really great benefits, but also some drawbacks. It does a really great job of using natural language in its search, allowing users to type in common phrases without having to think about keyword combinations. Google Scholar allows anyone to search through quality academic journals, do extensive forward and backward citation searching and even access the full text of articles unavailable in the library. Most importantly, Google has given millions of students and faculty instant access to knowledge and information that could have taken hours of working with a Reference librarian in a library. This access gives students more time to search for and read their sources and produce better research.

But… it still has flaws to consider. As good as the spoken language search has become, Google is still keyword-based, which puts the onus on the searcher to find and use the best keywords. Also, Google’s PageRank tool emphasizes websites that contain a high number of links, or that are linked to a high number of times, over those with less, which can rank pages with poor quality or inaccurate information higher above better quality pages. Google Scholar, for all the access it provides, most results are not full text and contains many non-refereed, non-academic sources mixed in the results. And while Google provides instant access to millions of pages of information, it leaves it up to YOU, the searcher, to determine what is of value and what is not.

Google has given us so much, but has also made it more important than ever that we can evaluate the sources we find, especially for scholarly research.

It is up to you to Google wisely.

– Brendan Johnson

For the last 3 years, Dr. Weidner has been working on a project that examines the prevalence and nature of living wage policies in American higher education (The Living Wage Policy Study)

Browse his blog to get a sense of this fascinating project that is relevant to all those working in higher education. As part of the Library Speaker Series, he will give a presentation on this research.

Please join us for what we expect to be a relevant and informative presentation.

Tuesday, September 25th
2:00-3:00 PM
Post Learning Commons 2nd Floor
Wachterhauser Seminar Room

Light refreshments will be served. Hope to see you there!

WHAT:  Based on his research and expertise,
Dr. Wolff will present “A Conversation About the Methods, Ethics, and Visualizations of Twitter Archives”.

WHEN:  February 23rd 2:00 PM

WHERE:  Wachterhauser Seminar Room,
2nd Floor Post Learning Commons

WHO:  All are invited. Please plan to join us for what we expect to be a lively discussion.

Light refreshments will be served.