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Posts Tagged ‘Post Learning Commons’

And For More Winter Break Reading Suggestions —

Below are NYT Notable Books in the SJU collection. Looking for a good read over Winter Break? Browse the Popular Reading collection (first floor Post Learning Commons). Suggest a title for the Popular Reading collection with this form.

American War by Omar El Akkad

Anything is Possible by Elizabeth Strout

The Dark Flood Rises by Margaret Draible

Fresh Complaint: stories by Jeffrey Eugenides

A Horse Walks into a Bar by David Grossman

Lincoln in the Bardo by George Sunders

Manhattan Beach by Jennifer Egan

My Absolute Darling by Gabriel Tallent

Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward

The Evangelicals: The Struggle to Shape America by Frances FitzGerald

The Blood of Emmett Till by Timothy B. Tyson

The Glass Universe: How the Ladies of the Harvard Observatory Took the Measure of the Stars by Dava Sobel

Grant by Ron Chernow

The Gulf: The Making of an American Sea by Jack E. Davis

Jainesville: An American Story by Amy Goldstein

Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann

Looking for the Stranger: Albert Camus and the Life of a Literary Classic by Alice Kaplan

The Undoing Project: A Friendship That Changed Our Minds by Michael Lewis

We Were Eight Years in Power: An American Tragedy by Ta-Nehisi Coates

What Happened by Hillary Rodham Clinton

Celebrating Five Years of the Post Learning Commons

To register for Wine and Cheese Reception*, click HERE

In the spring of 2012, the John and Maryanne Hennings Post
Learning Commons
,
a twenty-first century technology-inspired space was dedicated to complement the Library’s traditional services.
Located in the heart of campus, the 37,000 square foot facility is the intellectual hub of the University.

Designed as a one-stop shop for students with study needs: from
resources to expertise and instruction spaces, from information
technology to tutoring, from collaborative meeting rooms to quiet group study rooms, Post Learning Commons offers a variety of
student support services and environments. The expanded seating and cafe offers the extended campus community spaces to meet
informally in small groups.

Additionally, there is the Gerard Manley Hopkins, S.J., Special
Collections with a gallery for art collections to be on display.
The Wachterhauser Seminar Room, a technology-rich classroom type space, is a sought-after space for staff and faculty to use for
campus meetings and small events.

In anticipation of the upcoming 5th anniversary of the building of this versatile and well utilized facility, we have a series of
celebratory events planned.

Tuesday, April 4th through
Friday, April 7th

Display from University Archives
Griffiths Scholars Lounge and
Gerard Manley Hopkins, S.J., Special
Collections 3rd Floor Post Learning Commons

Tuesday, April 4th 11:00 AM to 2:00 PM
Photo booth and video recording
Prize wheel and snacks
Atrium of the Post Learning Commons

Wednesday, April 5th 4:30 PM to 6:30 PM
Photo booth and video recording
Prize wheel and snacks
Atrium of the Post Learning Commons

Thursday, April 6th 11:00 AM to 2:00 PM
Photo booth and video recording
Prize wheel and snacks
Atrium of the Post Learning Commons

Friday, April 7th 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM
Wine and Cheese Reception*
Display from University Archives
Griffiths Scholars Lounge and
Gerard Manley Hopkins, S.J., Special Collections
3rd Floor Post Learning Commons
*This event is for SJU faculty, staff and invited guests.

We are excited to share these events with you and hope that you can spare some time from your busy schedule to celebrate with us. If you are not available on Friday, we hope that you stop by to see the
exhibit on the 3rd floor of the Post Learning Commons. We have
several cases filled with material from the SJU Archives, including
clothing, medals, materials from ground breaking, and other
interesting memorabilia.

Our History in Photos


#PLC5th

 

 

 

 

A Visit with Pope Francis and the Holy Family

8 flight into egypt 2

Andean School, The Flight into Egypt, 18th century oil on canvas
Saint Joseph’s University Collection

The exhibition, “A Visit with Pope Francis and the Holy Family,” commemorates Pope Francis’ first visit to the United States and
his historic visit to Philadelphia for the World Meeting of Families (26-27 September 2015). Picking up on the latter theme, the exhibit features paintings from Spanish Colonial America of Gospel events in the life of the Holy Family. These paintings are selected from the Saint Joseph’s University Collection and are juxtaposed with texts drawn from the homilies, talks, and addresses of Pope Francis
reflecting on the subjects depicted in these art works.

This mode of presentation offers the opportunity to “enter into” what St. Ignatius of Loyola (1491-1556) in the Spiritual Exercises calls the “mysteries” of the life of Jesus, Mary and Joseph, accompanied and guided by Pope Francis himself. It also bears comparison with Ignatius of Loyola’s “method and order of meditating and contemplating,” as Pope Francis “narrate[s] […] the facts of the contemplation or meditation” so as to help the viewer garner “spiritual relish and fruit” (Spiritual Exercises, no. 2).

In the course of Pope Francis’s guided meditations on the
Holy Family, many of his signature themes are salient. These themes are of a piece with his project of “waking up” the Church and the world—laity, ordained and consecrated persons, all people of good will. And so for Pope Francis, Jesus’s birth in Bethlehem,
for example, manifests “the humility of God taken to the extreme,”
as He assumes “our frailty, our suffering, our anxieties, our desires and our limitations.” Concurrently, the divine humility
poses a challenge. In Pope Francis’s words, “Do we have the courage to welcome with tenderness the difficulties and problems of those who are near us, or do we prefer impersonal solutions, perhaps
effective but devoid of the warmth of the Gospel?” This and other Gospel events or mysteries are considered by Pope Francis in a way that unlocks their contemporary meaning and challenge in order to “wake up” the Church and society and to encourage Catholics,
Christians, and all people of good will to take a prophetic stance
on key issues such as economic mechanism promoting
unbridled consumerism combined with inequality, the new
idolatry of money, and the environment.

The exhibit, “A Visit with Pope Francis and the Holy Family,” will be on view on the 3rd floor of the John and Maryanne Hennings Post Learning Commons, in the Gerard Manley Hopkins, S.J.,
Special Collections Rooms and Durant Special Collections Lounge,
beginning in early September and running until mid-October.