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Posts Tagged ‘Fine Arts’

Pavia, Italy — City of Knowledge

Pavia, Italy — City of Knowledge
Currently on Exhibit
Post Learning Commons 3rd Floor

Pavia-Veduta-Aerea-del-Castello-Visconteo

Curated by the Civic Museums of Pavia and presented in partnership with the municipality of Pavia and the Italian Consulate of Philadelphia, this exhibit presents photographs of Pavia from the 19th to the 21st century by six Italian photographers, Fiorenzo Cantalupi, Guglielmo Chiolini, Antonio Manidi, Giuseppe Nazzari , Pierino Sacchi, and Ettore Valli.

Founded by the Romans on the left bank of the Ticino River, Pavia was a center of art and culture for centuries. Several times capital city during the Middle Ages (8th – 13th century), Pavia preserves many historical and material traces of Romanesque and Gothic architecture, including the massive walls that encircle it, splendid churches with richly sculpted façades (San Michele, San Pietro in Ciel d’Oro), and the lofty towers that overlook the palazzi and populate the city skyline. The Visconti family took control of the city in the mid-1300s and built an elegant and richly decorated castle, the characteristic Covered Bridge over the Ticino, the majestic cathedral (designed in part by Leonardo da Vinci) and the Certosa, a masterpiece of Renaissance art. The origins of the university—one of the oldest and most prestigious in Europe– also date to that period (1361). World renowned literati and scientists taught here in the 18th and 19th centuries, from the physicist Alessandro Volta, inventor of the battery, to the poet Ugo Foscolo, the naturalist Lazzaro Splallanzani and the neurologist Camillo Golgi. For the beauty of its monuments and the wealth of its educational tradition, Pavia is known as the “City of Knowledge”.

The Artist as Preacher: Conveying the Word of God through Art in the Saint John’s Bible

111031bible044WHAT: The University will host Father Eric Hollas, O.S.B., deputy to the President in the Office of Institutional Advancement of Saint John’s University in Collegeville, Minn., to speak about the artistry of the Saint John’s Bible and its ability to convey religious ideas. The first completely handwritten and illuminated, multi-volume Bible commissioned by a Benedictine Abbey since the advent of the printing press, the Saint John’s Bible weaves together word and image in a powerful way. Saint Joseph’s University is the only institution in the Philadelphia region to own a copy of the limited Heritage Edition, a full-size, fine art replica of the original Saint John’s Bible.

WHEN: Thursday, March 19th 7:00 PM

WHERE: Chapel of Saint Joseph-Michael J. Smith, S.J. Memorial
Refreshments immediately following in Wolfington Hall.

WHO: All are invited. Please plan to join us!
For more information, please contact Christopher Dixon, Archival Research Librarian, Drexel Library: “cdixon@sju.edu” or 610-660-2164.

 

 

Artstor

Looking to spruce up your research paper with something eye-catching?  Try adding some images!  Artstor is an extensive, searchable index of over 700,000 images of all kinds, from sculptures and classical paintings to famous journalist’s photos.  It’s ever-expanding, and their entire collection is browsable by Geography, Classification, or Collection.  Search for your topic, or browse through the collections for inspiration.

To get to Artstor, go to the library’s homepage, and to e-Resources A-Z.  This gives you a full list of our databases, including this great tool.

SF.