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Posts Tagged ‘collaboration’

Open House SJU Archives and Special Collections

As part of American Archives Month, University Archives and Special Collections will host an Open House in the Gerard Manley Hopkins, S.J. Special Collections Suite on October 25th during Free Period.

Notable pieces from our collections will be on view including a copy of the 1918 edition of Hopkins’ poems, rare books from our Jesuitica collection, and the marriage record from Old Saint Joseph’s Church for Francis A. Drexel and Emma Bouvier that was signed by Father Barbelin. Fr. Feeney and Carmen Croce, two esteemed colleagues, plan to join us.

You can search SJU Online for photos and objects of interest while visiting.

Light refreshments will be served. Please join us in celebrating our heritage and collections!

Cynwyd Trail Photography Exhibit — 2nd Floor Post Learning Commons

In Spring 2017, Saint Joseph’s University offered “Directed Projects” for the first time. It was a “trial of sorts,” according to Professor Susan Fenton, and the plan was to have students complete three independent projects. However, after the art curator of the Cynwyd Trail Café asked Professor Fenton if she would be interested in showcasing her students’ work at the café in May of 2107, the Cynwyd Trail project was added to the list.

The Cynwyd trail is a paved path where people can bike, walk, rollerblade and hike. The trail runs from Bala Cynwyd to Manayunk and was once an active train track. At the end of the path sits the Cynwyd Trail Café, which was formerly the old station house. Fenton was excited about the opportunity to exhibit her students’ work in the café, but thought why not make the theme of the exhibit about the Cynwyd Trail? Professor Fenton had her students go out to the trail the first time without their cameras to explore and just take in the scenery.  The second time, they returned with project ideas and their cameras.

The students were able to choose from two types of photographic techniques.  Gelatin Silver Printing, introduced in the 1870s, is the standard of all printing processes in which paper is coated with gelatin that contains light sensitive silver salts. This typically involves a photograph captured on film that is then processed and printed onto a light-sensitive emulsion paper in a darkroom. This is the more “traditional” method of fine art photography.  Archival Pigment Printing, introduced in the late 20th century, is a standard of printing that involves digital technology. Typically, the image is captured with a sensor (digital camera) and then printed with an inkjet process that involves inks jettisoned onto the surface of a non-light sensitive, porous paper. This is a more recent method of fine art photography.

According to Angelynn Rodriguez, her silver gelatin print, “Westminster,” reflected her particularly “creepy” style of photography.  “Westminster” highlights what she thinks to be a gate keeper’s quarters or possibly a chapel called Westminster. Angelynn found this abandoned, brick stone Victorian at the end of nature path branching off the Cynwyd trail. She found the building particularly inspiring because one wouldn’t know the building was there at first sight because “you have to actually follow the same foot path that I took in the photo.” Angelynn used a burning and dodging technique when printing to bring out the details of the trail she walked along.

Another student, Xiao Chen, contributed to the project with his archival pigment piece, “294.” “I spent time walking along the Cynwyd trail, photographing everything which could represent the Cynwyd trail. I learned to be patient, you have to look around carefully to get what you want. It was a good experience and I really enjoyed this project.” “294” was the number of the train he photographed. He explained, “I just wanted people to have their attention on the train” to focus on how the trail used to exist.  Although Xiao loved the process, he struggled with achieving the correct color composition when printing.  After several adjustments in Photoshop he was able to obtain a final print that mirrored the colors on the screen.

Professor Fenton believes the project, and Directed Projects in general, was a success. Although the class was intended to carry out independent projects, the “Cynwyd Trail” brought the class together, while still maintaining independent aspects.

Samantha K. O’Connell ‘20
Gallery Exhibition Research Assistant

**These two photographs are just a sampling of what is being displayed. Please allow time from your busy schedule to “walk the trail” through the photographs.**

 

Changes to Scholarship@SJU

Changes to Scholarship@SJU

For many years the Library has been compiling a bibliography of all scholarly output from SJU faculty.  In 2012 this bibliography was moved into the ‘Scholarship@SJU’ platform.  This platform utilizes Digital Commons Bepress (The Berkeley Electronic Press), a cloud-based repository meant to provide a wider audience to scholarly works.

While the Library has migrated bibliographic citations into Digital Commons, only a small fraction of those are available in full-text, while an ever-increasing number are available via the Library’s subscription databases.  After a review of usage statistics, the Library has determined that our subscription is not the best use of our resources.  Over the summer we plan to export data from the platform and look for more cost-effective ways to make this data available, possibly in collaboration with other efforts on campus.

The Library will continue to explore the best way to celebrate faculty and students’ scholarship. With similar platforms such as ResearchGate, Google Scholar, or discipline specific repositories such as PsyArXiv, Arxiv, and many others, we are questioning the need to duplicate similar information in our own repository. We will continue to keep an archive of faculty scholarship, but we need to find a cost-effective platform to present this information.

FAQs

Why are you moving from Digital Commons/Scholarship@SJU?
The expense of Digital Commons does not match the usage statistics of the repository. We’re also questioning how much of a repository is needed if there are other tools that already provide that service.

When will access to Digital Commons end?
July 1, 2018

Where will all of the information from Scholarship@SJU go?
We will migrate the citation information from Digital Commons to another format. The Library will retain all of the information and is already in discussions with IT about a suitable platform for the information.

What will be the replacement for Scholarship@SJU?
There will be a new Scholarship@SJU, but we need to talk with faculty and IT to determine the right tool. We hope to have some options by Spring 2019.
During that time, we will continue to collect faculty scholarship and preserve all previous submissions.

Questions? Please contact Anne Krakow akrakow@sju.edu

– Anne Krakow

Women’s History Month at the Library

The Drexel Library and Post Learning Commons is helping the campus celebrate Women’s History Month in March. On March 2, we hosted a Campus Coffee Hour with the Women’s Center.

For the duration of the month, the Library is highlighting some of the work by women who teach, write, research, and publish on our campus in a display called “Women@SJU Publish,” found on the first floor of the Post Learning Commons. Titles include works of popular fiction, histories, and research studies by our faculty, and all are available to check out.

If you are interested in reading more about women and women’s issues, Catherine Collins, one of our reference librarians, also compiled a recommended reading list which you can access here:
Women’s History Month Reading List.

– Catherine Collins

 

This display curated by Catherine Collins, Reference Librarian.

 

Glimpses: St. Joseph’s College During the Vietnam War Exhibit

Filmmaker Ken Burn’s recent documentary series on PBS The Vietnam War: An Intimate History brought the viewer back in time over 50 years to examine one of the most controversial periods in the United States during the 20th Century.   The Vietnam War played out on the world stage, but the program made clear local connections to people from communities across America and the hamlets of the former North and South Vietnam.  Saint Joseph’s College had its own links to the conflict, too.  In a new three-part exhibition, the Archives and Special explores some them through the camera lens of a young graduate, newspaper articles from the campus and the efforts of two alums and students to assist Vietnamese orphans.

Vietnam in Retrospect: Photographs 1969-1970 By Richard Zanoni ‘67

United States Army sergeant Richard Zanoni ’67 used his new hobby of photography to record daily life in Can Tho on the Mekong River Delta of South Vietnam during his tour of duty.  Some of his 35 mm film images captured a different side of the war, than what many Americans saw back home on television, with children at play, a barber cutting hair, a woman selling her goods in the marketplace and Buddhist monks.  However, others remind you that the war was ever present.  One shows a smiling Vietnamese boy carrying his younger brother, who had lost his leg and another, a little girl eating rice from a discarded beer can.  What happened to the people in his photographs is something that Sergeant Zanoni has often thought about since the war.

Fifty Years On:  The Vietnam War on Campus

Saint Joseph’s was not unlike many other college campuses in the country during the Vietnam War.  There was early support from the student body favoring continued participation in the war.  Faculty members held “scholarly discussions” on the merits of the conflict.  There were peace vigils and protests.  Guest speakers also appeared before student audiences.

This part of the exhibition draws heavily on articles from The Hawk student newspaper that can be found in The Hawk Digital Archive 1930-2015 .  It is a sampling of materials and not intended to be a comprehensive history of the events that took place on campus during the Vietnam War.  Perhaps, the Archives will hear from some of the “Golden Hawks” about their personal experiences.

Humanity in a Time of War: “Project Vietnam” Lends a Helping Hand to the
Stella Maris Orphanage

Lieutenant James L. Tobin ‘64 and Captain Edward Essl ’55 of the United States Air Force met a group of Vietnamese nuns struggling to run the Stella Maris (Star of the Sea) Orphanage near Da Nang, South Vietnam in 1966.  Lt. Tobin wrote to Lieutenant Colonel Daniel J. Boyle of the Saint Joseph’s College Reserve Officer Training Corps (R.O.T.C.) program requesting assistance from the College to aid the children. By the spring of 1967 “Project Vietnam” had been organized by the students to help solicit funds in order to build a hospital wing for the orphanage.  Through car washes, collection canisters and social mixers $1,540.00 was raised and presented to Sister Angela of the orphanage.

The exhibition will be on display until the end of the Spring Semester in the Gerard Manley Hopkins Special Collections area on the 3rd floor of the John and Maryanne Hennings Post Learning Commons.  A reception will be held there on Thursday, March 22nd at 3 P.M.  Richard Zanoni will be there to speak about his photographs. Several other Vietnam War veterans who are part of the SJU community will also offer remarks on the topic of the war.

Thank you to the Saint Joseph’s University Office of Veterans Services for their assistance with Vietnam in Retrospect.

– Christopher Dixon, Archival Research Librarian

How to Avoid Common Mistakes People Make with Insurance (Brown Bag Lunch Talk)

Visiting Professor Todd Erkis in the Finance Department will discuss his recently published consumer self-help book, What Insurance Companies Don’t Want You to Know: An Insider Shows You How to Win at Insurance, and answer questions.

Todd is the former Chief Actuary of Lincoln Financial and worked in the insurance industry for over 25 years prior to teaching full time at SJU.

Copies of the book will be available for purchase. It is also available through Amazon.

Tuesday, November 7 noon -1 p.m.
Wachterhauser Seminar Room

(2nd floor, Post Learning Commons)
Bring your lunch. Cookies and drinks will be provided.

This event is co-sponsored by Post Learning Commons and Drexel Library and the Administrative Staff Council.

Please rsvp here.

We look forward to seeing you!

Solar Eclipse Viewing Party

Take a break on Monday, August 21 and join us outside the Post Academic Center to view the upcoming solar eclipse. From 2:00 – 3:00pm, the Library will have special viewing glasses and moon pies to help you enjoy the eclipse. The Physics Department will provide information on the eclipse as well as a device to view sun spots.

While Philadelphia is not in the path of totality, there will be a partial eclipse visible. The eclipse will last from 1:20 p.m. to 4 p.m., reaching maximum coverage at 2:44 p.m. Other parts of the country, like Columbia, South Carolina and Nashville, Tennessee will experience a complete eclipse.

For more information, please contact Anne Krakow, akrakow@sju.edu.

Finals Week in the PLC and Drexel Library

During Finals Week, there will be an assortment of activities and snacks available to students with the intention of minimizing stress
and strengthening well-being. Some of these will be Library
initiatives while others are student-generated and/or developed through a partnership between the Library and another department.
The following list is just some of what is being offered.

Tuesday, December  13th
24 Hours
Free earbuds and earplugs*

finals_fall2016Wednesday, December 14th
24 Hours
Legos and coloring in the Cafe
Healthy snacks
Free earbuds and earplugs
9:00-11:00 PM
Massages in the Atrium

Thursday, December 15th
24 Hours
Legos and coloring in the Cafe
Healthy snacks
Free earbuds and earplugs
5:00-6:00 PM 
Stress-busters and snacks in the Atrium with Adult Student Life
9:00-11:00 PM
Massages in the Atrium

Friday, December 16th
24 Hours
Legos and coloring in the Cafe
Healthy snacks
Free earbuds and earplugs
2:00-4:00 PM
Pop-up Park in the Cafe with Student Life

Saturday, December 17th
Open until 12 midnight, reopens Sunday at 9:00 AM

Free earbuds and earplugs

Sunday, December 18th
Opens at 9:00 AM, continuing 24 hours until Tues., December 20th when we close at 9:00 PM

Free earbuds and earplugs

* Earbuds and earplugs are available on request unless supply runs out