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Library Lines Spring ’19

Spring Break and springtime around the corner — seems a good time to share with you the spring 2019 edition of Library Lines.

Inside you’ll find:

  • an interview with Jenifer Baldwin, our new Associate Director for Public Services
  • news about new electronic resources
  • the Director’s note

Along with these, there are additional noteworthy articles you may find valuable in your work. Take a look!

For more information, contact us.

“A Love Letter to Gerard Manley Hopkins, Jesuit Poet: On the Centennial of His First Book of Poems”

An internationally renowned Hopkins scholar and Emeritus Professor of English at Saint Joseph’s University, Joseph J. Feeney, S.J. is a lively and engaging speaker. Please join us as he presents “A Love Letter to Gerard Manley Hopkins, Jesuit Poet: On the Centennial of His First Book of Poems”

 

March 5, 2019
11:00 AM
Post Learning Commons, 2nd Floor
Wachterhauser Seminar Room

 

Gerard Manley Hopkins, S.J. was a little-known English priest and poet during the latter part of the 19th Century.  It was not until 1918, almost 30 years after Hopkins’ death, that his friend, Robert Bridges, Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom, compiled and edited the first collection of his poems.  Since that time, Hopkins has been recognized as one of the major poets of the Victorian Era.  Today, his poems, such as, “The Wreck of the Deutschland,” “The Windhover,” and “God’s Grandeur” are printed in numerous languages and enjoyed around the world.

To compliment Father Feeney’s personal insights into Hopkins’ poetry, two first edition copies of  The Poems of Gerard Manley Hopkins will be on view before and after the presentation.  Saint Joseph’s University is privileged to own four copies from the limited printing of 700.  The volumes are housed permanently in the Gerard Manley Hopkins, S.J. Specials Collections located in the Post Learning Commons.

-Christopher Dixon

 

This program is co-sponsored by SJU Library, the Jesuit community, and the Department of English. 

 

 

 

 

 

New All-Gender Restroom in Library

Post Learning Commons and Drexel Library
January 2019 

New All-Gender Restroom in Library

The Post Learning Commons and Drexel Library is pleased to announce the availability of an All-Gender restroom beginning January 14, 2019. Anyone can use this restroom regardless of gender identity or expression. The new restroom is located on the first floor of the Library building, replacing a women’s restroom. Single-gender restrooms are located throughout the Drexel Library and the Post Learning Commons.

The Post Learning Commons and Drexel Library strives to create an environment that is respectful, safe, and conducive to study.

For more information, please contact Anne Krakow, Library Director, akrakow@sju.edu

Deck the Halls!

If you missed coming in the Library a couple days last week, you were in for a treat by Friday’s end! Library staff and Grounds Crew were busy sorting, attaching, and decorating the various Christmas trees throughout the building. Do the lights match? Are the ornaments in the right places?

Several iterations of manger scenes appeared on Friday as well. There is one hanging at the Main Service Desk. Another is sprawled out across the top of the Atlas Case. This one has a starry backdrop and some twinkly lights.

There is a very special Christmas creche in front of the live evergreens in the Post Learning Commons Atrium. From the University Collection, it was created in the 20th century, but fashioned after the 18th century Neapolitan style. The particular figures of Mary and Joseph, the materials used to create them, as well as the coloring of their garments, is unique to this style.

Next time you are walking through the Atrium, take a few minutes to contemplate this exhibit, not only for its spiritual significance, but also for the fine craftsmanship that was employed. You will also find there a pamphlet with more information, put together by Carmen Croce, SJU Scholarly Press.

– Marian Courtney

Fe y Alegría Photo Exhibit

At 14,000 feet above sea level the light is different. It is brighter, clearer, warmer, more intense yet also more welcoming then the light those of us who live closer to sea level are used to experiencing. The less atmosphere between you and the sun the more direct your connection to the light source, and with thinner air there ends up being less between you and your subject. El Alto is a wonderful place for taking photographs.

But it is not just the lack of atmosphere that shapes these photographs, rather it is the energy supplied by the students, teachers, and parents. From the kids hanging out on a bench between classes, to the instructors interacting with their students, it was abundantly clear that the school was the center of the community.

Community was central to all of the Fe y Alegria schools we visited. Rather then treat education as a way to memorize information or take tests, in the schools we saw Fe y Alegria was carrying out education for the whole student. Whether that student was a five year old learning basic math or a returning adult student learning skills to pursue a better job, the schools were structured in a way to ask, “how can we do what is best for the whole student, how can we best serve the community?” Fe y Alegria schools often take as their mission to serve the poorest parts of society, seeing education as a means to improving life chances, but also recognizing that poverty itself is a serious barrier to education that requires extra steps to overcome. Education as pursuit of social justice.

These photographs capture various moments of education at Fe y Alegria schools. From the formally structured moments like music practice, and instructors working one on one with adult learners, to the informal moments between classes, what I saw, and hope to capture in these photographs was not just the importance of education to these communities but also a way of treating education that isn’t instrumentalist, focused on just getting you to the next step in life, but one that thinks carefully about what it means to help people develop and communities to thrive.

 

Note: These photographs were taken as part of a University sponsored partnership through the office of Faith and Mission to visit Fe y Alegria schools throughout Bolivia. In the spring of 2019 these schools will be sending a delegation here to Philadelphia and Saint Joseph’s University.

-David Parry
Associate Professor, Communications

Photos pictured are but a sampling of the full display, which can be viewed on the 2nd floor of the Post Learning Commons.

Take a few moments out of your busy day and come share in David’s experience.

 

One Book, One Philadelphia — SJU Library Can Help You Participate

Recently, the Free Library of Philadelphia announced it’s One Book, One Philadelphia” selection for 2019: Sing, Unburied, Sing: A Novel by Jesmyn Ward.

Besides  Sing, Unburied, Sing, the library has books from previous years. Some are featured below:

 

 

 

Open House SJU Archives and Special Collections

As part of American Archives Month, University Archives and Special Collections will host an Open House in the Gerard Manley Hopkins, S.J. Special Collections Suite on October 25th during Free Period.

Notable pieces from our collections will be on view including a copy of the 1918 edition of Hopkins’ poems, rare books from our Jesuitica collection, and the marriage record from Old Saint Joseph’s Church for Francis A. Drexel and Emma Bouvier that was signed by Father Barbelin. Fr. Feeney and Carmen Croce, two esteemed colleagues, plan to join us.

You can search SJU Online for photos and objects of interest while visiting.

Light refreshments will be served. Please join us in celebrating our heritage and collections!

Cynwyd Trail Photography Exhibit — 2nd Floor Post Learning Commons

In Spring 2017, Saint Joseph’s University offered “Directed Projects” for the first time. It was a “trial of sorts,” according to Professor Susan Fenton, and the plan was to have students complete three independent projects. However, after the art curator of the Cynwyd Trail Café asked Professor Fenton if she would be interested in showcasing her students’ work at the café in May of 2107, the Cynwyd Trail project was added to the list.

The Cynwyd trail is a paved path where people can bike, walk, rollerblade and hike. The trail runs from Bala Cynwyd to Manayunk and was once an active train track. At the end of the path sits the Cynwyd Trail Café, which was formerly the old station house. Fenton was excited about the opportunity to exhibit her students’ work in the café, but thought why not make the theme of the exhibit about the Cynwyd Trail? Professor Fenton had her students go out to the trail the first time without their cameras to explore and just take in the scenery.  The second time, they returned with project ideas and their cameras.

The students were able to choose from two types of photographic techniques.  Gelatin Silver Printing, introduced in the 1870s, is the standard of all printing processes in which paper is coated with gelatin that contains light sensitive silver salts. This typically involves a photograph captured on film that is then processed and printed onto a light-sensitive emulsion paper in a darkroom. This is the more “traditional” method of fine art photography.  Archival Pigment Printing, introduced in the late 20th century, is a standard of printing that involves digital technology. Typically, the image is captured with a sensor (digital camera) and then printed with an inkjet process that involves inks jettisoned onto the surface of a non-light sensitive, porous paper. This is a more recent method of fine art photography.

According to Angelynn Rodriguez, her silver gelatin print, “Westminster,” reflected her particularly “creepy” style of photography.  “Westminster” highlights what she thinks to be a gate keeper’s quarters or possibly a chapel called Westminster. Angelynn found this abandoned, brick stone Victorian at the end of nature path branching off the Cynwyd trail. She found the building particularly inspiring because one wouldn’t know the building was there at first sight because “you have to actually follow the same foot path that I took in the photo.” Angelynn used a burning and dodging technique when printing to bring out the details of the trail she walked along.

Another student, Xiao Chen, contributed to the project with his archival pigment piece, “294.” “I spent time walking along the Cynwyd trail, photographing everything which could represent the Cynwyd trail. I learned to be patient, you have to look around carefully to get what you want. It was a good experience and I really enjoyed this project.” “294” was the number of the train he photographed. He explained, “I just wanted people to have their attention on the train” to focus on how the trail used to exist.  Although Xiao loved the process, he struggled with achieving the correct color composition when printing.  After several adjustments in Photoshop he was able to obtain a final print that mirrored the colors on the screen.

Professor Fenton believes the project, and Directed Projects in general, was a success. Although the class was intended to carry out independent projects, the “Cynwyd Trail” brought the class together, while still maintaining independent aspects.

Samantha K. O’Connell ‘20
Gallery Exhibition Research Assistant

**These two photographs are just a sampling of what is being displayed. Please allow time from your busy schedule to “walk the trail” through the photographs.**

 

Changes to Scholarship@SJU

Changes to Scholarship@SJU

For many years the Library has been compiling a bibliography of all scholarly output from SJU faculty.  In 2012 this bibliography was moved into the ‘Scholarship@SJU’ platform.  This platform utilizes Digital Commons Bepress (The Berkeley Electronic Press), a cloud-based repository meant to provide a wider audience to scholarly works.

While the Library has migrated bibliographic citations into Digital Commons, only a small fraction of those are available in full-text, while an ever-increasing number are available via the Library’s subscription databases.  After a review of usage statistics, the Library has determined that our subscription is not the best use of our resources.  Over the summer we plan to export data from the platform and look for more cost-effective ways to make this data available, possibly in collaboration with other efforts on campus.

The Library will continue to explore the best way to celebrate faculty and students’ scholarship. With similar platforms such as ResearchGate, Google Scholar, or discipline specific repositories such as PsyArXiv, Arxiv, and many others, we are questioning the need to duplicate similar information in our own repository. We will continue to keep an archive of faculty scholarship, but we need to find a cost-effective platform to present this information.

FAQs

Why are you moving from Digital Commons/Scholarship@SJU?
The expense of Digital Commons does not match the usage statistics of the repository. We’re also questioning how much of a repository is needed if there are other tools that already provide that service.

When will access to Digital Commons end?
July 1, 2018

Where will all of the information from Scholarship@SJU go?
We will migrate the citation information from Digital Commons to another format. The Library will retain all of the information and is already in discussions with IT about a suitable platform for the information.

What will be the replacement for Scholarship@SJU?
There will be a new Scholarship@SJU, but we need to talk with faculty and IT to determine the right tool. We hope to have some options by Spring 2019.
During that time, we will continue to collect faculty scholarship and preserve all previous submissions.

Questions? Please contact Anne Krakow akrakow@sju.edu

– Anne Krakow