Today's Hours

Posts Tagged ‘books’

February is Black History Month

Black History is American History. One way to explore our country’s fascinating and complex history is to browse the book display in the PLC 1st floor Lounge.

Here is a sample of the titles you will see:presidentobama-copyrightclear
America Behind the Color Line by Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

The History of Black Business in America : Capitalism, Race,
Entrepreneurship
by Juliet E.K. Walker

Between God and Gangsta Rap : Bearing Witness to Black Culture by Michael Eric Dyson

Acres of Skin : Human Experiments at Holmesburg Prison: A Story of Abuse and Exploitation in the Name of Medical Science by Allen M. Hornblum

Black Intellectuals: Race and Responsibility in American Life by William M. Banks

This little list barely scratches the surface of the diverse selection both in the display and elsewhere in the Library’s collection. Stop by and take a look — books are available for checkout!

New Jim Crow-It’s What We’re Reading

February 2016

A monthly offering from Drexel Library’s staff about the books we’ve read.

New Jim Crow cover from Google Books

New Jim Crow cover from Google Books

The New Jim Crow 
Alexander, Michelle

Published in 2010, this book is about an issue that is not new to many people. As someone who missed this title when it came out, I highly recommend it.

Ms. Alexander, a civil rights lawyer and legal scholar, leads readers through the details of mass incarceration in America. She argues that mass incarceration is a new form of systemic oppression that directly grew to take the place of Jim Crow laws. The common misperception is that “guilty” prisoners serve their time in jail and are released. In reality laws against ex-felons discriminate against and disenfranchise them for the rest of their lives.  Most people know that our laws are applied  discriminatorily against minority groups, especially African Americans, but they may not connect the dots to systemic racism and instead chalk it up to “bad apples” or specific municipalities. This book will convince you otherwise. Thoroughly researched, it could and has been used as a textbook for college classes. As the author brings in stories of real people damaged by our criminal justice system, it remains a riveting read even though it is also a dense and disturbing one.

Reforms that are currently in demand, such as more monitoring of police activity and reducing sentences for most drug crimes, do not obviate Ms. Alexander’s underlying argument. It is even more important to understand the system while we are thinking about these issues. Focusing only on one or two aspects of the system she presents will not be enough to save our American people or our collective soul.

The New Jim Crow is part of the Library’s collection and is
available on the second floor. Make sure to check the availability online. It may already be checked out.

Book Signing — Eric Mitchell, ’71 MD, MA FACPE CPE

ericmitchellWHO:  An alum who attended SJU on a basketball
scholarship, Dr. Mitchell  is also a graduate of the Perleman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania.

WHAT:  Dr. Mitchell is coming to campus to promote his book: The Flow of Life: Keeping Your Dream Alive.
“…Every teen, student, student athlete from Generation X, and present millennial should make this book a must-read. You will be inspired by his story to a point of focusing on your life.”  – Basketball Hall of Fame Coach, Morgan Wootten, DeMatha High School basketball coach and noted author of multiple books on
principles of basketball.

WHEN:  Friday, January 15th 4:00-6:00 PM

WHERE:  SJU, Post Learning Commons Atrium

We are excited to host Dr. Mitchell’s book signing and hope that you can join us!

the flow of life

 

Let the Great World Spin – It’s What We’re Reading


January 2016

A monthly offering from Drexel Library’s staff about the books we’ve read.

Let the Great World Spin

Let the Great World Spin
McCann, Colum

 

Let the Great World Spin is a richly textured novel that takes place in NYC on the day in 1974 that Philippe Petit crossed the twin towers of the World Trade Center on a tightrope.

Throughout the book, we meet many individuals, rich and poor, upstanding and outcast alike, whose lives are all connected in someway. Of these, is Corrigan, an Irish monk of sorts living in the Bronx. Early on, Corrigan says he is looking to be in the peaceful center while the great world spins. This imagery is used again, with Petit almost the physical manifestation of the stillness at the center of the bustling city. While he has trained in all kinds of conditions, it is this ability to be at the quiet center that without which, he would not have been successful.

Alternative Country, Folk Rock singer Brandi Carlile employs a similar metaphor in “The Eye” as she sings, “You can dance in a hurricane but only if you’re standing in the eye.” I think McCann would agree.

Not without heartbreak, this book is peppered with tales of unlikely friendships and impish humor. Both restoring your faith in humanity while suffering with its depressing truths, Let the Great World Spin, is a captivating read.

Let the Great World Spin is part of the Library collection and is available in the Popular Reading Section in the Post Learning Commons: PR6063.M24 L47 2009

Season’s Readings 2015

Each year, in lieu of sending a Christmas card, the staff of Drexel
Library share their list of recommended reads, affectionately known as Season’s Readings.Seasons Readings image

Check out this year’s list (no pun intended). Maybe there is a title that interests you or looks like it might make a good gift for that certain someone on your list!

Happy Reading!

 

 

So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed – It’s What We’re Reading


December 2015

A monthly offering from Drexel Library’s staff about the books we’ve read.

So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed

So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed
Ronson, Jon

 

Author Jon Ronson describes social media sites, such as Twitter, have provided a “voice to the voiceless.” It is a place for one to express opinions and feelings, sometimes using this voice to right a wrong. This free expression however has turned into another venue for online shaming and internet vigilantism. Ronson details the experiences of people who have felt the brunt of the humiliation after making mistakes, on Twitter, in their personal life or career. The author explains that while the person in question may deserve some ridicule, the forcefulness and the extent of the damage makes Ronson draw comparisons to angry mobs brandishing pitchforks and putting the accused in stockades for public humiliation. More disturbing is that Ronson points out the schadenfreude and the sense of justice felt by those that have dehumanized the wrong doer. Even if the person “had it coming” does the punishment fit the crime?

So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed can be found on the first floor in the Popular Reading section of the Post Learning Commons

Bird Box — It’s What We’re Reading


November 2015

A monthly offering from Drexel Library’s staff about the books we’ve read.

Bird Box

Bird Box
Malerman, Josh

 

You’ll be unable to take your eyes away from this crisp, taut tale. Josh Malerman’s novel is a page-turning combination of Stephen King’s The Mist and Cormac McCarthy’s The Road.

Imagine spending years raising two babies alone. Imagine feeling constant terror that you or your children may glimpse a “creature,” the mere sight of which causes lethal insanity.

But you know of a safe haven, 20 miles downriver. You know you must eventually get yourself and your children there, but how?

This is the plight of heroine Malorie. You’ll admire her courage and determination while wondering how you would manage in her situation.

Bird Box is compelling because it forces the reader to imagine the horrors barely but beautifully described within it. There is nothing scarier than one’s own imagination. This is the author’s debut novel. I can’t imagine what comes next.

Bird Box is shelved in the Popular Reading on the First Floor of the Post Learning Commons.

Chew on This: Suniti Sharma

Suniti_Sharma

WHAT:  Suniti Sharma, Ph.D., Associate Professor
Graduate Teacher Education, will be presenting from a book she co-edited, Internationalizing Teacher Education for Social Justice: Theory, Research, and Practice (Research for Social Justice).

WHEN:  October 7th, 12:30PM

WHERE:  Post Learning Commons, Wachterhauser Seminar Room

Cookies and drinks will be served. We anticipate this to be an engaging presentation touching on mission-related themes.

Please plan to join us!

Chew On this logo

 

 

She’s Not There: A Life In Two Genders – It’s What We’re Reading


October 2015

A monthly offering from Drexel Library’s staff about the books we’ve read.

She's Not There: A Life In Two Genders

She’s Not There: A Life In Two Genders
Boylan, Jennifer Finney

 

Before Caitlyn Jenner, there was Jennifer Finney Boylan. She’s Not There is Boylan’s memoir of changing genders. Boylan, born as James, from a very young age felt that she was female. After getting married and fathering two children, she transitioned to Jennifer.

Boylan’s story is accessible on many levels, because although most people are not transgendered, many do go through times of feeling as though they don’t fit in with everyone else, marital challenges, or difficulties with family and friends. Through it all, Jennifer Boylan maintains a positive outlook and a sense of humor.

Currently the Anna Quindlen Writer-in-Residence at Barnard College of Columbia University, Jennifer Finney Boylan will be speaking at Saint Joseph’s University on February 11, 2016.

She’s Not There: A Life In Two Genders is shelved on the second floor in the Drexel Library.

Ron Wendling Booktalk

Wendling 2 (2)WHAT:  Ron Wendling, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of English, will  discuss his recent memoir, Unsuitable Treasure: An Ex-Jesuit Makes Peace With the Past.

WHERE:  Post Learning Commons Wachterhauser Seminar Room

WHEN:  Monday, September 14th at 3:30 PM

All are invited. Light refreshments will be served.

Please plan to join us for what we anticipate will be an engaging presentation and discussion!