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Posts Tagged ‘book suggestion’

One Book, One Philadelphia — SJU Library Can Help You Participate

Recently, the Free Library of Philadelphia announced it’s One Book, One Philadelphia” selection for 2019: Sing, Unburied, Sing: A Novel by Jesmyn Ward.

Besides  Sing, Unburied, Sing, the library has books from previous years. Some are featured below:

 

 

 

New Book Display — “Vive la Révolution!: The Movements and Revolutions that Changed History (for better or worse)

We may think that our politics has been intense over the last couple of years, but it’s still nothing compared to what has happened in the past. As the country prepares for this year’s Mid-Term elections, we present our newest book display: Vive la Révolution!: The Movements and Revolutions that Changed History (for better or worse).” This collection describes Revolutions of all kinds, from the paradigm-shifting French Revolution to the bloodless, symbolic “Revolution of 1800” to the deadly rise of Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party in Germany and more.

The collection also focuses on some of the important social movements that have shaped modern society, from the Civil Rights Movement to the quest for equal rights for Women and the LGBTQ community.

You can browse these books from home or check them out in person at the display case on the 1st floor of the Post Learning Commons between the elevator and the lounge. The display will last through the rest of November. Vive la Révolution!
–  Brendan Johnson
This display curated by Brendan Johnson.

Happiness is a Cup of Coffee and a Good Book!

The buzz about the new student-run Saxbys in Campion is hard to miss — between the article in The Hawk as well as the one in Philadelphia magazine, it is an exciting opportunity and we wish them success in their venture.

The Library has books (and e-books!) on all things coffee. Check them out!

Uncommon Grounds: the History of Coffee and How it Transformed Our World

The World Atlas of Coffee: From Beans to Brewing -Coffees Explored, Explained and Enjoyed

Coffee: A Comprehensive Guide to the Bean, the Beverage, and the Industry

Brewing Justice: Fair Trade Coffee, Sustainability, and Survival

Caffeinated: How Our Daily Habit Helps, Hurts, and Hooks Us

– Cynthia Slater and Marian Courtney

 

 

“First Man” Opens This Weekend

You’ve seen the movie First Man and the idea of space exploration captures your imagination. SJU Library can help fill the void!

We have books (and e-books!) on the Apollo project and the race to the moon.

With Fall Break on the horizon, take a look at these offerings and “explore!”

Apollo in the Age of Aquarius

No Requiem for the Space Age: The Apollo Moon Landings and American Culture

Fallen Astronauts: Heroes Who Died Reaching for the Moon

Moon Landing: A Chronology of the Apollo Missions

Moonshots and Snapshots of Project Apollo: A Rare Photographic History

The Race: The Uncensored Story of How America Beat Russia to the Moon

– Cynthia Slater and Marian Courtney

You’ve Seen the Movie…Now Read the Book!

 

Recent films like The Revenant, Les Misérables, It, and The Fault in Our Stars all have one thing in common. Each film was first a popular book. May’s book display on the first floor of the Post Learning Commons features several popular novels made into acclaimed films.

You’ve seen the movie…now read the book! will be up now through the end of June. Please stop by and browse if you need a little breather from studying. Or, better yet, check one out to read after finals!

– Catherine Collins

 

 

 

 

This display curated by Catherine Collins, Reference Librarian.

Women’s History Month at the Library

The Drexel Library and Post Learning Commons is helping the campus celebrate Women’s History Month in March. On March 2, we hosted a Campus Coffee Hour with the Women’s Center.

For the duration of the month, the Library is highlighting some of the work by women who teach, write, research, and publish on our campus in a display called “Women@SJU Publish,” found on the first floor of the Post Learning Commons. Titles include works of popular fiction, histories, and research studies by our faculty, and all are available to check out.

If you are interested in reading more about women and women’s issues, Catherine Collins, one of our reference librarians, also compiled a recommended reading list which you can access here:
Women’s History Month Reading List.

– Catherine Collins

 

This display curated by Catherine Collins, Reference Librarian.

 

And For More Winter Break Reading Suggestions —

Below are NYT Notable Books in the SJU collection. Looking for a good read over Winter Break? Browse the Popular Reading collection (first floor Post Learning Commons). Suggest a title for the Popular Reading collection with this form.

American War by Omar El Akkad

Anything is Possible by Elizabeth Strout

The Dark Flood Rises by Margaret Draible

Fresh Complaint: stories by Jeffrey Eugenides

A Horse Walks into a Bar by David Grossman

Lincoln in the Bardo by George Sunders

Manhattan Beach by Jennifer Egan

My Absolute Darling by Gabriel Tallent

Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward

The Evangelicals: The Struggle to Shape America by Frances FitzGerald

The Blood of Emmett Till by Timothy B. Tyson

The Glass Universe: How the Ladies of the Harvard Observatory Took the Measure of the Stars by Dava Sobel

Grant by Ron Chernow

The Gulf: The Making of an American Sea by Jack E. Davis

Jainesville: An American Story by Amy Goldstein

Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann

Looking for the Stranger: Albert Camus and the Life of a Literary Classic by Alice Kaplan

The Undoing Project: A Friendship That Changed Our Minds by Michael Lewis

We Were Eight Years in Power: An American Tragedy by Ta-Nehisi Coates

What Happened by Hillary Rodham Clinton

-Cynthia Slater, Business Reference Librarian

Season’s Readings 2017

The 2017 edition of the SJU Library’s Season’s Readings is now available.

This year’s list is full of interesting books as exciting as previous years, with something for everyone.

Peruse the list and get that special someone a great holiday gift, find something for yourself, or simply give the list itself as a gift.

See Season’s Readings 2017 for this year’s list as well as links to all the previous years. Enjoy!

– Marian Courtney

 

 

Commonwealth: a novel – It’s What We’re Reading


June 2017

“What We’re Reading” is a feature offering periodic reviews from Drexel Library’s staff about the books we’ve read. If you find a book which interests you and it is not in our collection, please feel free to acquire the book through our Interlibrary Loan service.

Commonwealth: a novel

Commonwealth

by Ann Patchett

“The Christening party took a turn when Albert Cousins arrived with gin” – from this opening line that sparks the curiosity of the reader, leaving them hungry for details, Commonwealth, the latest novel from seasoned writer Ann Patchett, does not disappoint. A story of two families the Keatings and Cousins, simultaneously torn apart and pieced together by divorce and remarriage. The characters, made almost real by Patchett, survive various alliances and betrayals, and through the years develop various coping skills. In the end, it all seems to be about acceptance, and for each family member, there’s a unique spin, a way that this quality makes the most sense for their journey and where they are at this point in their life. In sum, a heartwarming story of families and the flawed characters who are part of them.

This book is part of the Library collection and can be found on the second floor book stacks.

A Gentleman in Moscow — It’s What We’re Reading


March 2017

“What We’re Reading” is a feature offering periodic reviews from Drexel Library’s staff about the books we’ve read. If you find a book which interests you and it is not in our collection, please feel free to acquire the book through our Interlibrary Loan service.

A Gentleman in Moscow

A Gentleman in Moscow

by Amor Towles

A member of the Russian aristocracy, spared only by the act of having lent his well-connected name to a friend’s counter-revolutionary poem, Count Rostov is sentenced to life imprisonment in a Moscow hotel. Through the lens of the Metropol Hotel and the lives of the people who work there, he witnesses the shocking political and social upheaval taking place in Russia from 1922 through the 1950’s – the rise of communism, the death of Lenin, then Stalin, and the power struggle that followed. This is a book about finding grace in reconciling to one’s fate without becoming resigned to it, and surviving long enough to find one’s purpose.

A Gentleman in Moscow can be found in the Popular Reading Section on the first floor of the Post Learning Commons.