Today's Hours

Library Speaker Series with C. Ken Weidner, II, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Management

For the last 3 years, Dr. Weidner has been working on a project that examines the prevalence and nature of living wage policies in American higher education (The Living Wage Policy Study)

Browse his blog to get a sense of this fascinating project that is relevant to all those working in higher education. As part of the Library Speaker Series, he will give a presentation on this research.

Please join us for what we expect to be a relevant and informative presentation.

Tuesday, September 25th
2:00-3:00 PM
Post Learning Commons 2nd Floor
Wachterhauser Seminar Room

Light refreshments will be served. Hope to see you there!

Campus Coffee Hour with Print Services

As you begin to settle into a new academic year, take a few minutes to network with campus colleagues. The staff of Print Services will be available to share information and answer questions you may have about their work. Coffee, tea, and light breakfast fare will be served.

September 21st
9:30 am – 10:30 am
Post Learning Commons, 2nd Floor Lounge

Hope to see you there!

 

 

“Tiny Tomes” — or — you can’t judge a book by its size!

Curating a book display is limited only by the imaginations of those creating the display. Sometimes a suggested topic corresponds with a season while other times it corresponds to a campus initiative. And then there are those special times that our own creative juices get flowing and we pull together a display of books that are unrelated except for one characteristic. Our latest display is ones of those times and in this case, we bring you “Tiny Tomes,” a sampling of our smallest books.

With size being the common denominator, book topics range from history, to poetry, to spirituality, to literature, as well as several others. While most books are from the main collection, the Curriculum Materials Center (CMC) is also well represented in the new display.

You can browse the list of Tiny Tomes from your cozy armchair, although not all book jackets will be visible. Better yet, stop by, take a look, check one out! Display can be found on the 1st floor of the Post Learning Commons between the elevator and the lounge for at least the rest of September.

 

Library Speaker Series with Owen W. Gilman, Jr., Professor of English

The Hell of War Comes Home:  Imaginative Texts From the Conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq comes to a hard conclusion, with solace for none:

“There’s plenty of good literature and film from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and in the aggregate, these texts present war as Homer knew it–albeit without any interference from the gods.  War in the real is complex.  It is hell.  But most of the texts explored in the middle and late chapters of this study will be consigned to the fringes of American culture.  Sure enough, looking ahead, there will be situations (at least one per generation) that boil down to the “acquiesce in the necessity” moment of decision.  Shall we measure up to the standard established in the Declaration of Independence–or shall we fail to honor the past?  With repeated practice, nearly incessant experience, the pattern becomes habitual. Habits are hard to break, especially those reinforced by the mythology of America’s origins and all the righteousness that attends the sustenance of myth.  We are trapped.  There is no way out–except one.  There will be war.  The hell of war becomes the hell of home. We have seen the past.  We know the future.”

Tuesday, September 11
11:00 AM – 12:30 PM
Wachterhauser Seminar Room
2nd Floor Post Learning Commons

Please join us for what we expect to be an engaging presentation and discussion with Dr. Gilman.

Light refreshments will be served.

 

#bookface Books — A Mid-Summer Display

 

Our newest book display has a bit of a twist. All the books you’ll find there can be used for #bookface photos which can be posted to Instagram, Twitter or Facebook.
#BookfaceFriday is especially popular on Social Media. If not already familiar with #bookface, next time you have some down time, search for yourself to see the creative things done with book cover images.

If this looks like fun to you, feel free to use any of the books in our display to create your #bookface photo. Books were selected from various areas of the collection resulting in a variety of options to choose from.

All books in the display are available for checkout!

 

Technology Upgrades in Drexel Library and the Post Learning Commons

  • All 50 computers replaced in Drexel Lab
  • All 30 computers replaced in the PLC
  • All 21 computers replaced in the DMZ
  • All Library workspaces are now fully migrated to Windows 10 and all computers are running the Adobe Creative Cloud suite of applications
  • 29 computers in Drexel now have Factset installed on them.
Thanks to the Technology Support Services staff and summer student workers!

Cynwyd Trail Photography Exhibit — 2nd Floor Post Learning Commons

In Spring 2017, Saint Joseph’s University offered “Directed Projects” for the first time. It was a “trial of sorts,” according to Professor Susan Fenton, and the plan was to have students complete three independent projects. However, after the art curator of the Cynwyd Trail Café asked Professor Fenton if she would be interested in showcasing her students’ work at the café in May of 2107, the Cynwyd Trail project was added to the list.

The Cynwyd trail is a paved path where people can bike, walk, rollerblade and hike. The trail runs from Bala Cynwyd to Manayunk and was once an active train track. At the end of the path sits the Cynwyd Trail Café, which was formerly the old station house. Fenton was excited about the opportunity to exhibit her students’ work in the café, but thought why not make the theme of the exhibit about the Cynwyd Trail? Professor Fenton had her students go out to the trail the first time without their cameras to explore and just take in the scenery.  The second time, they returned with project ideas and their cameras.

The students were able to choose from two types of photographic techniques.  Gelatin Silver Printing, introduced in the 1870s, is the standard of all printing processes in which paper is coated with gelatin that contains light sensitive silver salts. This typically involves a photograph captured on film that is then processed and printed onto a light-sensitive emulsion paper in a darkroom. This is the more “traditional” method of fine art photography.  Archival Pigment Printing, introduced in the late 20th century, is a standard of printing that involves digital technology. Typically, the image is captured with a sensor (digital camera) and then printed with an inkjet process that involves inks jettisoned onto the surface of a non-light sensitive, porous paper. This is a more recent method of fine art photography.

According to Angelynn Rodriguez, her silver gelatin print, “Westminster,” reflected her particularly “creepy” style of photography.  “Westminster” highlights what she thinks to be a gate keeper’s quarters or possibly a chapel called Westminster. Angelynn found this abandoned, brick stone Victorian at the end of nature path branching off the Cynwyd trail. She found the building particularly inspiring because one wouldn’t know the building was there at first sight because “you have to actually follow the same foot path that I took in the photo.” Angelynn used a burning and dodging technique when printing to bring out the details of the trail she walked along.

Another student, Xiao Chen, contributed to the project with his archival pigment piece, “294.” “I spent time walking along the Cynwyd trail, photographing everything which could represent the Cynwyd trail. I learned to be patient, you have to look around carefully to get what you want. It was a good experience and I really enjoyed this project.” “294” was the number of the train he photographed. He explained, “I just wanted people to have their attention on the train” to focus on how the trail used to exist.  Although Xiao loved the process, he struggled with achieving the correct color composition when printing.  After several adjustments in Photoshop he was able to obtain a final print that mirrored the colors on the screen.

Professor Fenton believes the project, and Directed Projects in general, was a success. Although the class was intended to carry out independent projects, the “Cynwyd Trail” brought the class together, while still maintaining independent aspects.

~ Samantha K. O’Connell ‘20
Gallery Exhibition Research Assistant

**These two photographs are just a sampling of what is being displayed. Please allow time from your busy schedule to “walk the trail” through the photographs.**

 

Changes to Scholarship@SJU

Changes to Scholarship@SJU

For many years the Library has been compiling a bibliography of all scholarly output from SJU faculty.  In 2012 this bibliography was moved into the ‘Scholarship@SJU’ platform.  This platform utilizes Digital Commons Bepress (The Berkeley Electronic Press), a cloud-based repository meant to provide a wider audience to scholarly works.

While the Library has migrated bibliographic citations into Digital Commons, only a small fraction of those are available in full-text, while an ever-increasing number are available via the Library’s subscription databases.  After a review of usage statistics, the Library has determined that our subscription is not the best use of our resources.  Over the summer we plan to export data from the platform and look for more cost-effective ways to make this data available, possibly in collaboration with other efforts on campus.

The Library will continue to explore the best way to celebrate faculty and students’ scholarship. With similar platforms such as ResearchGate, Google Scholar, or discipline specific repositories such as PsyArXiv, Arxiv, and many others, we are questioning the need to duplicate similar information in our own repository. We will continue to keep an archive of faculty scholarship, but we need to find a cost-effective platform to present this information.

FAQs

Why are you moving from Digital Commons/Scholarship@SJU?
The expense of Digital Commons does not match the usage statistics of the repository. We’re also questioning how much of a repository is needed if there are other tools that already provide that service.

When will access to Digital Commons end?
July 1, 2018

Where will all of the information from Scholarship@SJU go?
We will migrate the citation information from Digital Commons to another format. The Library will retain all of the information and is already in discussions with IT about a suitable platform for the information.

What will be the replacement for Scholarship@SJU?
There will be a new Scholarship@SJU, but we need to talk with faculty and IT to determine the right tool. We hope to have some options by Spring 2019.
During that time, we will continue to collect faculty scholarship and preserve all previous submissions.

Questions? Please contact Anne Krakow akrakow@sju.edu

 

 

You’ve Seen the Movie…Now Read the Book!

 

Recent films like The Revenant, Les Misérables, It, and The Fault in Our Stars all have one thing in common. Each film was first a popular book. May’s book display on the first floor of the Post Learning Commons features several popular novels made into acclaimed films.

You’ve seen the movie…now read the book! will be up now through the end of June. Please stop by and browse if you need a little breather from studying. Or, better yet, check one out to read after finals!