Today's Hours

Cynwyd Trail Photography Exhibit — 2nd Floor Post Learning Commons

In Spring 2017, Saint Joseph’s University offered “Directed Projects” for the first time. It was a “trial of sorts,” according to Professor Susan Fenton, and the plan was to have students complete three independent projects. However, after the art curator of the Cynwyd Trail Café asked Professor Fenton if she would be interested in showcasing her students’ work at the café in May of 2107, the Cynwyd Trail project was added to the list.

The Cynwyd trail is a paved path where people can bike, walk, rollerblade and hike. The trail runs from Bala Cynwyd to Manayunk and was once an active train track. At the end of the path sits the Cynwyd Trail Café, which was formerly the old station house. Fenton was excited about the opportunity to exhibit her students’ work in the café, but thought why not make the theme of the exhibit about the Cynwyd Trail? Professor Fenton had her students go out to the trail the first time without their cameras to explore and just take in the scenery.  The second time, they returned with project ideas and their cameras.

The students were able to choose from two types of photographic techniques.  Gelatin Silver Printing, introduced in the 1870s, is the standard of all printing processes in which paper is coated with gelatin that contains light sensitive silver salts. This typically involves a photograph captured on film that is then processed and printed onto a light-sensitive emulsion paper in a darkroom. This is the more “traditional” method of fine art photography.  Archival Pigment Printing, introduced in the late 20th century, is a standard of printing that involves digital technology. Typically, the image is captured with a sensor (digital camera) and then printed with an inkjet process that involves inks jettisoned onto the surface of a non-light sensitive, porous paper. This is a more recent method of fine art photography.

According to Angelynn Rodriguez, her silver gelatin print, “Westminster,” reflected her particularly “creepy” style of photography.  “Westminster” highlights what she thinks to be a gate keeper’s quarters or possibly a chapel called Westminster. Angelynn found this abandoned, brick stone Victorian at the end of nature path branching off the Cynwyd trail. She found the building particularly inspiring because one wouldn’t know the building was there at first sight because “you have to actually follow the same foot path that I took in the photo.” Angelynn used a burning and dodging technique when printing to bring out the details of the trail she walked along.

Another student, Xiao Chen, contributed to the project with his archival pigment piece, “294.” “I spent time walking along the Cynwyd trail, photographing everything which could represent the Cynwyd trail. I learned to be patient, you have to look around carefully to get what you want. It was a good experience and I really enjoyed this project.” “294” was the number of the train he photographed. He explained, “I just wanted people to have their attention on the train” to focus on how the trail used to exist.  Although Xiao loved the process, he struggled with achieving the correct color composition when printing.  After several adjustments in Photoshop he was able to obtain a final print that mirrored the colors on the screen.

Professor Fenton believes the project, and Directed Projects in general, was a success. Although the class was intended to carry out independent projects, the “Cynwyd Trail” brought the class together, while still maintaining independent aspects.

~ Samantha K. O’Connell ‘20
Gallery Exhibition Research Assistant

**These two photographs are just a sampling of what is being displayed. Please allow time from your busy schedule to “walk the trail” through the photographs.**

 

Changes to Scholarship@SJU

Changes to Scholarship@SJU

For many years the Library has been compiling a bibliography of all scholarly output from SJU faculty.  In 2012 this bibliography was moved into the ‘Scholarship@SJU’ platform.  This platform utilizes Digital Commons Bepress (The Berkeley Electronic Press), a cloud-based repository meant to provide a wider audience to scholarly works.

While the Library has migrated bibliographic citations into Digital Commons, only a small fraction of those are available in full-text, while an ever-increasing number are available via the Library’s subscription databases.  After a review of usage statistics, the Library has determined that our subscription is not the best use of our resources.  Over the summer we plan to export data from the platform and look for more cost-effective ways to make this data available, possibly in collaboration with other efforts on campus.

The Library will continue to explore the best way to celebrate faculty and students’ scholarship. With similar platforms such as ResearchGate, Google Scholar, or discipline specific repositories such as PsyArXiv, Arxiv, and many others, we are questioning the need to duplicate similar information in our own repository. We will continue to keep an archive of faculty scholarship, but we need to find a cost-effective platform to present this information.

FAQs

Why are you moving from Digital Commons/Scholarship@SJU?
The expense of Digital Commons does not match the usage statistics of the repository. We’re also questioning how much of a repository is needed if there are other tools that already provide that service.

When will access to Digital Commons end?
July 1, 2018

Where will all of the information from Scholarship@SJU go?
We will migrate the citation information from Digital Commons to another format. The Library will retain all of the information and is already in discussions with IT about a suitable platform for the information.

What will be the replacement for Scholarship@SJU?
There will be a new Scholarship@SJU, but we need to talk with faculty and IT to determine the right tool. We hope to have some options by Spring 2019.
During that time, we will continue to collect faculty scholarship and preserve all previous submissions.

Questions? Please contact Anne Krakow akrakow@sju.edu

 

 

You’ve Seen the Movie…Now Read the Book!

 

Recent films like The Revenant, Les Misérables, It, and The Fault in Our Stars all have one thing in common. Each film was first a popular book. May’s book display on the first floor of the Post Learning Commons features several popular novels made into acclaimed films.

You’ve seen the movie…now read the book! will be up now through the end of June. Please stop by and browse if you need a little breather from studying. Or, better yet, check one out to read after finals!

 

Feeling Stressed? Some Ways We Can Help

Reserve a study room
click the “Spaces” box on the Library homepage

5-Minute Massages
Monday, 5/7 and Tuesday, 5/8
9:00 – 11:00 PM
PLC Atrium

 

 

 

 


Legos and Coloring

Monday, 5/7 and Tuesday, 5/8
24 hours
PLC Cafe

Healthy Snacks
Monday, 5/7 and Tuesday, 5/8
24 hours
PLC Cafe

FREE Earbuds and Earplugs   
Friday, 5/4 until supplies run out
Drexel Library Service Desk

 

A Conversation with Richard Zanoni ‘67, photographer of “Vietnam in Retrospect: Photographs 1969-1970”

One of the elements making up the Glimpses: St. Joseph’s College During the Vietnam War Exhibit are an assortment of photographs titled, “Vietnam in Retrospect: Photographs 1969-1970.”

United States Army sergeant Richard Zanoni ’67 used his new hobby of photography to record daily life in Can Tho on the Mekong River Delta of South Vietnam during his tour of duty. Some of his 35 mm film images captured a different side of the war, than what many Americans saw back home on television, with children at play, a barber cutting hair, a woman selling her goods in the marketplace and Buddhist monks. However, others remind you that the war was ever present. One shows a smiling Vietnamese boy carrying his younger brother, who had lost his leg and another, a little girl eating rice from a discarded beer can. What happened to the people in his photographs is something that Sergeant Zanoni has often thought about since the war.

Come meet Sargeant Zanoni for what we hope will be an engaging conversation
Thursday, April 19, 2018
2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Post Learning Commons Gerard Manley Hopkins
S.J. Special Collections Third Floor

 

 

 

 

Coffee Hour with the Post Learning Commons and Drexel Library and the Pedro Arrupe Center for Business Ethics

The Pedro Arrupe Center for Business Ethics will be co-sponsoring
the April Campus Coffee Hour with the Library

Friday, April 13th
9:30 am – 10:30 am
Post Learning Commons 2nd Floor Lounge

The Arrupe Center is showcasing the student-led undergraduate SJU Net Impact chapter of the international organization Net Impact. Net Impact is a community of 100,000 students and professional leaders empowering ethical and sustainable practices.

Enjoy coffee and snacks while you network with colleagues.
Mark your calendar and plan to join us.

Autism Awareness Book Display

In conjunction with April 2nd, World Autism Day, as well as the whole month of April being National Autism Awareness Month, the Library is showcasing some books from our collection on this topic. The books featured vary in their presentation of the topic: some are more clinical, while others relate more of a personal journey. You can see the list of books in our Autism Awareness Book Display here, or if your schedule allows, and you would like to educate yourself more about autism, feel free to stop by and browse through one or more of them. If you would like to dive deeper into one or more of the books displayed, know that these books are available for check out.

Hot off the Presses — Library Lines Spring 2018

 

Inside the latest issue of Library Lines you will find out about efforts to preserve institutional history, interesting facts about some of our staff, as well as forthcoming projects — to name just a few of the topics.

Please take a few minutes out of your busy day to see some of what is currently happening at the Library and let us know what you think – we’d love to hear!

Women’s History Month at the Library

The Drexel Library and Post Learning Commons is helping the campus celebrate Women’s History Month in March. On March 2, we hosted a Campus Coffee Hour with the Women’s Center.

For the duration of the month, the Library is highlighting some of the work by women who teach, write, research, and publish on our campus in a display called “Women@SJU Publish,” found on the first floor of the Post Learning Commons. Titles include works of popular fiction, histories, and research studies by our faculty, and all are available to check out.

If you are interested in reading more about women and women’s issues, Catherine Collins, one of our reference librarians, also compiled a recommended reading list which you can access here:
Women’s History Month Reading List.