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Exhibit

Ex libris: The Rare Book Collection of Jean Heck, Ph.D., Haub School of Business

Ex libris: The Rare Book Collection of Jean HeckEx libris: The Rare Book Collection of Jean Heck, Ph.D., Haub School of Business

Gerard Manley Hopkins, S.J., Special Collection Rooms (3rd Floor)
John and Maryanne Hennings Post Learning Commons

Jean Heck, Ph.D., the Brian Duperreault ’69 Chair for Risk Management and Insurance in the Haub School of Business, is an avid bibliophile and collector of rare books. This exhibit features a number of books from Dr. Heck’s collection. While most of these books are from the early modern period (1500 until the French Revolution [1789]), some are from earlier or later periods. In the former category is an incunabulum of  St. Jerome’s commentary on St. Paul’s letter to the Ephesians (Venice, 1498) and in the latter, a handsome Jesuit atlas of 1900.

The books in this exhibition are divided into four thematic sections. First, there are the sacred texts of Judaism and Islam: a Torah scroll on sheepskin of c. 1500, and the first English translation of the Koran directly from Arabic (1734). Next, are several Christian Bibles:

· the 1579 Louvain edition of the Vulgate (the late 4th-century Latin translation of the Bible prepared by St. Jerome [c. 342-420])

· the 1639 edition of the King James Bible—a seminal work that influenced innumerable writers and thinkers, including Lincoln, Melville, Faulkner, Hemingway, and Martin Luther King, Jr., among many others

· Richard Challoner’s version of the Douay-Rheims Catholic Bible, which took as its base text the King James Bible.

The third thematic grouping focuses on key texts of the early modern Catholic renewal and Protestant Reformation. Here is seen a volume of Martin Luther’s complete works (Wittenberg, 1561), the decrees of the Council of Trent (1545-63) and the post-Tridentine edition of the Code of Canon Law, and the 1540 version of the Constitutions of the Society of Jesus and the briefer Rules of the Society of Jesus.

The final section is devoted to the history and ministry of the Jesuits:

· its missionary activity (a 16th-century stone glyph from a Jesuit reduction in Peru, a Jesuit atlas that documents—with polychrome maps—Jesuit provinces and missions worldwide, and a volume of late 18th-century letters from Jesuit missionaries in India)

· examples of the primacy Jesuits gave to the “word,” be it written, spoken, or printed (notably, an extremely rare copy of the Italian translation of Pedro de Ribadeneira’s biography of St. Ignatius of Loyola (Venice, 1587), illustrated with an elegantly engraved portrait of the saint, and an edition of St. Robert Bellarmine’s The Eternal Happiness of the Saints (Lyon, 1618) published during the author’s lifetime [1542-1621])

· two examples of anti-Jesuit literature of the kind that eventually led to the Society’s suppression in 1773

Through this exhibition, Dr. Heck wants to share the joy that rare books have given him with his colleagues and the students of Saint Joseph’s University. This exhibit complements the university’s own Jesuitica Collection, maintained in the Special Collections Room and available for study by users of the university library.

An 8-page printed guide is available at the exhibit venue that provides a narrative context for understanding the books exhibited.

The exhibit will be on display through May .

For more information, please contact:

Rev. Joseph F. Chorpenning, O.S.F.S., S.T.L., Ph.D.
Editorial Director
Saint Joseph’s University Press
5600 City Avenue
Philadelphia, PA  19131-1395
U.S.A.

E-mail: jchorpen@sju.edu
Tel. 610/660-1214

The Book Project: Exhibit of SJU Student Art in "Appropriated Art"

Book ProjectPost Learning Commons
2nd Floor Lounge

The Post Learning Commons and Drexel Library is happy to house an exhibit of the work of Saint Joseph’s students from Professor Ron Klein’s class, Appropriated Art.

The Book Project  –  Making art from everyday objects is regarded as a form of artistic expression.
In Professor Ron Klein’s class Appropriated Art, the class explored the idea of reconfiguring a book into an object of art.

The students took advantage of each book’s characteristics and qualities.  Some were formal, such as hard back or soft, thick or thin, message or no message. Others concerned themselves primarily with the conceptual content of the book. Students combined both formal qualities and conceptual cleverness to produce beautiful and interesting projects.

9/30 – 10/6 Banned Books Week

Banned Books Week: Celebrating the 30th Anniversary of the Freedom to Read

Banned Books Week 2012September 30 – October 6, 2012

Banned Books Week, held annually in late September, celebrates our freedom to read. During the week, the American Library Association hopes to bring attention to the importance of intellectual freedom and the First Amendment. The Drexel Library will showcase some of the banned and challenged books in a display on the first floor of the Post Learning Commons.

A challenged book is described as “an attempt to remove or restrict materials, based upon the objections of a person or group” while a banned book is the removal of such materials from a collection or curriculum. (About Banned & Challenged Books) Books are most often challenged because their contents are considered sexually explicit, have offensive language, or unsuited to any age group. While the challenges may be well-meaning, demanding libraries to censor constitutionally protected speech is a violation of the First Amendment.

Please take a look at the display and feel free to check out a banned book!

 

Beware of the Books

For more information, please see American Library Association’s website on banned and challenged books.

Gerard Manley Hopkins, S.J. Special Collections Exhibit

Gerard Manley Hopkins, S.J.On Thursday, March 29, 2012 the SJU Community met to honor the Leadership and Generosity of the Jesuit Community at Saint Joseph’s University and to view the new Gerard Manley Hopkins, S.J. Special Collections exhibit located on the third floor of the John and Maryanne Hennings Post Learning Commons.

Named after Hopkins, the esteemed nineteenth century Jesuit Victorian poet, the special collections feature, among other items, a diverse and growing collection of Jesuitica and Jesuitana, which includes more than 400 volumes, some quite rare, published between the 16th and 20th centuries.

Nov. Display: Illustrations of Injured Veterans

THE JOE BONHAM PROJECT

During the month of November, the Francis A. Drexel Library is displaying reproductions of some of the illustrations of THE JOE BONHAM PROJECT.   The display is located on the first floor, to the left of the front Service Desk.

THE JOE BONHAM PROJECT, formed by Michael D. Fay, a former Marine combat artist, was orchestrated in an effort to increase the awareness of our veterans and was comprised of the work of several wartime illustrators. “…the PROJECT takes its name from the central character in Johnny Got His Gun, Dalton Trumbo’s 1938 novel of a World War I soldier unable to communicate with the outside world due to the extent of his wounds” (Alicia Lozano, WTOP.  James Panero, Managing Editor and art critic at The New Criterion, was the curator of the exhibit when it showed in the STOREFRONT GALLERY in Brooklyn.

For more information, see the Blog with YouTube video on the Exhibit.

"Grace Before Dying" Exhibit 9/21 – 10/21

“Grace Before Dying” Exhibit
September 21-October 21, 2011
Second Floor North
Francis A. Drexel Library

The Faith Justice Institute presents this moving photographic documentary and quilt display chronicling the prisoner-run hospice program at Angola State Penitentiary in Louisiana

“More information is about the organization is available at: http://www.gracebeforedying.org/intro.html

Banned Books Week Display 9/24-10/1


Banned Books Week September 24-October 1, 2011

“If there is a bedrock principle underlying the First Amendment, it is that the government may not prohibit the expression of an idea simply because society finds the idea itself offensive or disagreeable.”

Supreme Court Justice William J. Brennan, Jr., in Texas v. Johnson .

Every year, for one week in September, the American Library Association (ALA) celebrates the freedom to read by highlighting the past year’s challenged and banned books. During Banned Books Week, ALA hopes to bring attention to the importance of intellectual freedom and the First Amendment. For the month of September, the Francis A. Drexel Library will showcase some of the banned and challenged books on ALA’s lists.

A challenged book is described as “an attempt to remove or restrict materials, based upon the objections of a person or group” while a banned book is the removal of such materials from a collection or curriculum. (About Banned & Challenged Books) Books are most often challenged because their contents are considered sexually explicit, have offensive language, or unsuited to any age group. While the challenges may be well-meaning, demanding libraries to censor constitutionally protected speech is a violation of the First Amendment.

Please take a look at the display and feel free to check out a banned book!

For more information, please see American Library Association’s website on banned and challenged books.

New Exhibit at the Library

Throughout the month of March, Francis A. Drexel Library will host an exhibit of sample pieces from the 2008 Mordechai Anielewicz Creative Arts Competition. Named for the heroic teenager who organized Jewish resistance and gave his life fighting in the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising of 1943, this annual competition provides students in grades 7-12 in all public, private and parochial schools in Philadelphia and its suburbs, with both a forum and opportunity to respond to the Holocaust by means of creative expression. Panels of judges with expertise in various creative disciplines evaluate the 400 or so submissions. The artistic submissions are mounted and exhibited professionally by the Moore College of Art and Design. All of the winning written submissions are published in a booklet and distributed at the awards ceremony which is held each spring at Moore, in conjunction with the exhibition. For more information, contact Anne Krakow, Associate Director for Public Services and Programming, akrakow@sju.edu or x1906.