These pages list past Institute programs and its directors' presentations elsewhere. Streaming videos are available for many recent events.

From Moses to Moses There Was None Like Moses: Moses Maimonides and His Controversial Legacy

November 12, 2012

Video

Monday, November 12, 2012 at 4 P.M. in the Chapel of Saint Joseph

Sponsored as part of the series by SJU Learns: “Great Religious Figures Who Are Not Founders”

Moses Maimonides was a 12th-century philosopher, physician, and jurist who influenced St. Thomas Aquinas.

Rabbi Alan Iser is an Adjunct Professor at Saint Joseph’s University and Villanova University.

 

 

Relations between the State of Israel and the Holy See: 1993 to the Present

October 4, 2012

Video

Rev. Dr. John T. Pawlikowski

Thursday, October 4, 2012 at 4 p.m.  Mandeville Hall, Room 103

 

After several decades of hesitation, the Vatican and State of Israel established formal diplomatic relations in 1993. In the subsequent years, there are been difficulties in fully implementing it, and from time to time various controversies have unsettled the relationship.  Fr. Pawlikowski will survey the history down to the present moment.

John T. Pawlikowski, a priest of the Servite Order, is Professor of Social Ethics at the Catholic Theological Union in Chicago, where he also directs the Catholic-Jewish Studies Program in the school’s Cardinal Joseph Bernardin Center. He is the author/editor of more than fifteen books, including The Challenge of the Holocaust for Christian Theology, Christ in the Light of the Christian-Jewish Dialogue, Jesus and the Theology of Israel, Biblical and Theological Reflections on The Challenge of PeaceThe Ecological Challenge: Ethical, Liturgical, and Spiritual Responses, Reinterpreting Revelation and Tradition: Jews and Christians in Conversation, and Ethics in the Shadow of the Holocaust.

Remembering from the Heart: Thoughts for Yom Hashoah 2012

April 19, 2012

In observance of HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL DAY

Thursday, April 19, 2012; 4 p.m. – 6 p.m. 

Chapel of Saint Joseph – Michael J. Smith Memorial

Memory is a function of the mind but it is most meaningful when it also engages the heart.  This is especially true when Jews and Christians come together to reflect on and commemorate the Shoah.  Victoria Barnett will reflect on the challenges that have shaped the post-Shoah interfaith conversation since 1945 and talk about what it means to remember the Shoah today, both historically and religiously.

The presentation and discussion will be followed immediately by a prayer service of memory and commitment to interfaith amity.

Dr. Victoria Barnett, Staff Director, Committee on Church Relations, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Washington, DC

Response: Rabbi Alan Iser, Adjunct Professor, Department of Theology and Religious Studies, Saint Joseph’s University

Jewish-Catholic Seder: Experiencing Exodus Together

March 25, 2012

Sunday, March 25, 2012, 4 p.m.

Campion Hall: Banquet Hall North

Co-sponsored by the Institute for Jewish-Catholic Relations of Saint Joseph’s University, the Jewish Community Relations Council, Main Line Reform Temple-Beth Elohim, Temple Har Zion, and SJU’s Interfaith Task Force.

The Passover Meal, the Seder, marks one of the major feasts on the Jewish calendar. Passover is also important for Christians since the story of Israel’s Exodus from Egypt is a principal element of many Christian observances, especially during Holy Week. The Seder meal is a wonderful way for Christians to have a direct experience of Jewish spiritual life, and for both communities to rededicate themselves to a world in which slavery and injustice are no more.

The SJU Jewish-Catholic Seder is a full catered kosher meal. Participants will join in the prayers, songs, and celebration in as close to a traditionally Jewish form as possible. A limited number of seats are available for 50 Christians and 50 Jews – first come, first served – so register as soon as possible!

Cursing the Christians? A History of the Birkat HaMinim

February 27, 2012

Video

Rabbi Dr. Ruth Langer

Monday, February 27, 2012 at 7 p.m. | Campion Hall: Banquet Hall North

 

The Birkat Haminim is a Jewish prayer that in its earliest forms cursed apostates, sectarians, Christians, and enemies of Israel, especially imperial powers.  In her new book Cursing the Christians?, Prof. Ruth Langer draws on shifting liturgical texts and the diverse polemics and apologetics concerning the prayer to trace its history from Late Antiquity, through the Middle Ages and modernity, to the prayer’s transformation into a general petition that God remove all evil from the world. Her research is sure to be the definitive treatment of this topic for many years to come.

Rabbi Dr. Ruth Langer is Associate Professor of Jewish Studies and Associate Director of the Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College. Her research and writing focuses on Jewish liturgy and Christian-Jewish relations. Currently serving as chair of the Council of Centers on Jewish-Christian Relations and co-editor of its professional journal, Studies in Christian-Jewish Relations, Prof. Langer is the also author or editor of: Liturgy in the Life of the Synagogue: Studies in the History of Jewish Prayer, ed. with Steven Fine (Eisenbrauns, 2005) and To Worship God Properly: Tensions between Liturgical Custom and Halakhah in Judaism (Hebrew Union College Press, 1998).

Hairy Women and Noble Savages: Jews, Christians, and Others during the Long 18th Century

December 5, 2011

Dr. Iris Idelson-Shein
Monday, December 5 – 7 p.m. | Haub Executive Center, McShain Hall

Dr. Iris Idelson-Shein teaches history at Tel Aviv University and is currently a fellow at Penn’s Herbert D. Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies. She studies early modern and modern Jewish thought and published on early modern views of gender and ethnicity. She will discuss the radical transformation in how 18th-century Europeans defined identity. The shift from a worldview dominated by scripture and faith, to one dominated by science demanded new explanations for the differences among people. She will explore how Jewish writers tackled these changes while trying to define their own position in the new paradigm.

Dr. Idelson-Shein’s presentation at SJU is the last of a three-part series, “Between Cross and Crescent: Jews in the Christian and Muslim Worlds,” co-sponsored by the Herbert D. Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies at the University of Pennsylvania, Beth Am Israel, and Main Line Reform Temple-Beth Elohim.

An Abrahamic Reunion: How Religion Can Be a Force for Peace in the Middle-East

November 10, 2011

Audio (from National Public Radio)

11:30 a.m. in Bellarmine 246.

Sheikh Ghassan Manasra is Director of the Islamic Cultural Center in Nazareth where as a Sheikh and Fulbright scholar he teaches tolerance and interreligious dialogue to high school teachers and principals; publishes an Arabic newspaper to spread a moderate and tolerant Islam; and teaches courses on Judaism to Muslims.

Rabbi Eliyahu McLean is Director of the Jerusalem Peace-Makers, a network of religious leaders and grassroots peace workers in Jerusalem and the and Holy Land. He travels globally to teach interreligious dialogue and to organize reconciliation  events. www.jerusalempeacemakers.org

Toward a Jewish Theology of Other Religions

November 2, 2011

Wednesday, November 2, 2011 – 7 p.m. | Mandeville Hall 103

 

Dr. Deborah Weissman holds the Ph.D. in Jewish education from Hebrew University. A prize-winning Jewish educator, she is currently the President of the International Council of Christians and Jews. She will address the topic of Judaism and religious pluralism. Learning to live with the Other—without stereotyping, prejudice, and, even more serious, the violence engendered by such prejudice—is an issue that may determine the very survival of the human race on this planet. What does Jewish theology have to contribute, if anything, to an exploration of these questions? Using classical and modern Jewish sources, how can Jews begin to think about believers in other religions and their beliefs?

“And When I Left, My Heart Wept for Both of Them” 

October 16, 2011

Reflections on Eleven Years of Living on the Seam between Israel and Palestine

Sunday, October 16, 2011 – 3 p.m. | Mandeville Hall 103

 

Rev. Michael McGarry was recently named President of the Paulist Fathers. For the past eleven years he was rector of the Tantur Ecumenical Institute, at the southern end of Jerusalem, just north of Bethlehem. Tantur is an international center for mainly English-speaking Christian scholars to come, to study, to explore. Staffed by Palestinians, both Muslim and Christian, Tantur is uniquely located between two populations earnestly yearning for peace. Throughout his career, Fr. McGarry has worked for better relations between Christians and Jews, but his time in the Holy Land has profoundly affected his ministry, his perspective on prospects for peace, and his ideas about authentic relations between Christians and Jews. He will address both academic and real-life situations affecting Christians and Jews concerned about peace in the Holy Land and our relations in the USA.

Jewish-Catholic Seder: Experiencing Exodus Together

March 27, 2011

Sunday, March 27, 2011, 5 p.m.

Haub Executive Suite – McShain Hall

Co-sponsored by the Institute for Jewish-Catholic Relations of Saint Joseph’s University, the Jewish Community Relations Council, Main Line Reform Temple-Beth Elohim, Temple Har Zion, Temple Adath Israel, and SJU’s Interfaith Task Force.

The Passover Meal, the Seder, marks one of the major feasts on the Jewish calendar. Passover is also important for Christians since the story of Israel’s Exodus from Egypt is a principal element of many Christian observances, especially during Holy Week. The Seder meal is a wonderful way for Christians to have a direct experience of Jewish spiritual life, and for both communities to rededicate themselves to a world in which slavery and injustice are no more.

The SJU Jewish-Catholic Seder is a full catered kosher meal. Participants will join in the prayers, songs, and celebration in as close to a traditionally Jewish form as possible. A limited number of seats are available for 50 Christians and 50 Jews – first come, first served – so register as soon as possible!