The Apostle Paul in the Jewish Imagination

Changing views of a foundational Christian figure:

Tuesday, September 26, 2017 at 7 – 8:30 p.m.

Video

Large Lapsley Room, Haub Executive Center in McShain Hall [Campus Map]

 

Few Jews, historically speaking, have engaged with the writings of Paul, the first-century Jewish Apostle to the Gentiles. However, the modern period has witnessed burgeoning Jewish interest in this topic, reflecting profound concerns with his views about the nature of Jewish authenticity and relations between Jews and Christians. In exploring these issues, Jewish commentators have presented Paul in a number of apparently contradictory ways. He is seen as both contributing to and undermining interfaith harmony, both the founder of Christianity and a convert to it, both a Jew committed to Judaism and an apostate from Judaism, and both the chief architect of the religious foundations of Western thought and their destroyer. This lecture offers an overview of the ways in which Jews have engaged with this central figure of Christian tradition. Free and open to the public; classes are welcome.

Dr. Daniel Langton is Professor of Jewish History in the department of Religions and Theology at the University of Manchester, UK, where he is Co-director of its Centre for Jewish Studies. His major publications include: The Apostle Paul in the Jewish Imagination: A Study in Modern Jewish-Christian Relations (2010) and Claude Montefiore: His Life and Thought (2002), an intellectual biography of the founder of Anglo-Liberal Judaism. As an advisor to the archbishop of Canterbury’s Office of Inter Faith Relations, he authored Children of Zion: Jewish and Christian Perspectives on the Holy Land (2008). His recent research projects include Jewish engagement with Darwinian theory and with atheism.