Jews and Lutherans after 500 Years

To mark the quincentenary of the Protestant Reformation:

Wednesday, October 25, 2017 at 7 – 8:30 p.m.

Large Lapsley Room, Haub Executive Center in McShain Hall [Campus Map]

 

October 31, 1517, the date on which Martin Luther sent his famous “95 Theses” to the archbishop of Mainz, is generally considered to be the start of the Protestant Reformation. This epochal movement divided Western Christianity into competing – sometimes warring – factions, but what did it mean for European Jews? How did they fare as a vulnerable minority in Protestant countries as compared to Catholic ones? What were Luther’s attitudes toward Jews and what did later Lutherans teach about them before and after the Holocaust? What can Jews, Lutherans, and Catholics learn from each other today? Join us as an expert on these questions guides us through this history. Free and open to the public; classes are welcome.

Rev. Dr. Brooks Schramm is the Kraft Professor of Biblical Studies at Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg. His most recent book, Martin Luther, the Bible, and the Jewish People: A Reader (Fortress Press, 2012) was co-authored with his spouse, Kirsi Stjerna. He is currently working on Luther’s 1543 anti-Jewish treatise, On the Ineffable Name and On the Lineage of Christ. He serves as editor of Gettysburg Seminary’s scholarly journal Seminary Ridge Review. Professor Schramm’s scholarly interests also include the history of the Hebrew language, Jewish biblical interpretation, and biblical theology.