Intercession 2016

The Communications Department will be offering two classes over the Intercession period. Find the information about both classes below.

COM 465: Bearing Witness: Images of War Past and Present 

Mike Lyons 

The course runs from Jan. 2 through Jan. 14. The first half (or so) of the course will be online – Jan. 2-7. We will meet in the classroom beginning Jan. 8.

For most of us the visual experience and memory of war comes from images. We will likely never see war first-hand so photographs and films shape our collective understanding and memory of armed conflict. This course will investigate images of war, including photographs, film and even comics and video games. These include films and photographs that depict and document several conflicts, including Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan.

We will discuss the dual purposes of photography and film – as art and as the documentation of an event (“bearing witness”). The course will also explore the ethical choices photojournalists and photo editors make and the impact of these photos on national and global politics.

This course is neither a film course nor a photography course. We will neither be taking pictures nor spending much time talking about trends in photography or analyzing the aesthetic qualities of films or photographs. This is a course on the “mediatization” of political events.

This is a compact, two-week course. That means that, theoretically, the idea here is to jam a semester’s worth of stuff into two weeks. That’s absurd. A two-week course is a unique beast and in a course like this it is impossible to get in a semester’s worth of discussion or material. So we will focus on a few key areas and explore them deeply.

 

COM 372 Web Design

Andy Famiglietti

This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of web design and development. Students will learn about web technologies and standards while building accessible and usable web sites. No previous experience is necessary, and the course will center on beginner/intermediate aspects of web design and markup languages–specifically, HyperText Markup Language (HTML5) and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS3). Readings will focus on the Web’s architecture and its history, the basics of site development, and current conversations about best practices (such as responsive design, grid systems, user experience, digital video, and mobile technologies). Students will study web technologies and apply best practices to their own goals or interests–creating, for example, a personal web portfolio or a basic client project–while developing a rhetorical and technological understanding of web-based communication.