New TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) Minor

From Dr. Jennifer Ewald, jewald@sju.edu

What is TESOL? 

TESOL stands for Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages.  SJU offers a 6-course TESOL minor that provides essential training for the challenging task of teaching the English language at home or abroad in private language schools, bilingual education programs, community centers, and in other contexts that do not require state certification. 

What is the difference between TESOL and Linguistics? 

Linguistics is often divided into two broad fields:  theoretical linguistics and applied linguistics.  TESOL is considered to be a subset of the field of applied linguistics, a field that also includes specializations such as sociolinguistics, translation, and forensic linguistics, among others.  An understanding of the ways in which languages are used, the field of language acquisition, and principles of language teaching methodology constitute potential areas of overlap between what is studied by students of linguistics and students of TESOL.  A minor in TESOL incorporates important pedagogical training that prepares students to teach English with both cultural and linguistic sensitivity. 

Does a TESOL minor provide certification to teach ESL in the Pennsylvania or New Jersey school system?  No. 

Completion of a TESOL minor does not certify students to teach ESL and does not award any kind of teaching credentials.  It does provide undergraduate students with a background in TESOL that would prepare them to apply for related fellowships, serve the community in various ESL-related positions, and demonstrate some level of undergraduate study of TESOL that would improve their application to related graduate level programs.

Could a TESOL minor go on to pursue graduate degrees in TESOL and an English teaching career?

Yes.  After completing a TESOL minor, a student could pursue certification in ESL (check with the SJU Education Department for more information regarding state requirements) or apply to graduate level MA and PhD programs in TESOL. 

Could a student double minor in both TESOL and another discipline (e.g., English, Linguistics, Education, Psychology, Biology, Spanish, International Business, etc.)?

Absolutely.  Check with Dr. Jennifer Ewald (jewald@sju.edu) for more information.

What do all the related acronyms represent? 

The field of English language teaching uses many acronyms including the following:

TESOL – Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

TESL – Teaching English as a Second Language

TEFL – Teaching English as a Foreign Language

ESL – English as a Second Language (specifically in an English-speaking context such as Australia, Great Britain, the United States, etc.)

EFL – English as a Foreign Language (specifically in a context where English is not a native language such as Chile, Japan, Thailand, etc.) 

SL – second language (any language a person learns after his/her first language)

FL – foreign language (a language not native in the country in which it is learned)

Curriculum

 A TESOL minor requires 6 courses including the following:

1.  LIN 201 English Grammar for TESOL           

2.  LIN 301 Teaching Language At Home and Abroad

3.  LIN 490 English Language Teaching Internship

4.  Any 3 additional courses selected from the following options:

                    LIN 101 or 150

                    LIN 280

                    LIN 320

                    LIN 340

                    LIN 317 or 401

                    EDU 246

 Related course titles:

LIN 101: Introduction to Linguistics

LIN 150: Language, Communication and Culture

LIN 150: Language, Linguistics and the Real World

LIN 201: English Grammar for TESOL

LIN 280: Language Acquisition and Learning

LIN 320: Phonetics

LIN 301: Teaching Language at Home and Abroad

LIN 317: Sociolinguistics

LIN 340: Communication in Social Contexts:  Can You Hear Me Now?

LIN 401: Bilingualism and Language Diversity

LIN 490: Linguistics Internship (an English language teaching internship)

EDU 246: Literacy, Language and Culture

Fall 2013: Midterm Grades & Course Withdrawal

What are Midterm Grades?

Midterm grades are a progress report of your course grade to this point in the semester; they are not part of your permanent academic transcript. First Year Students will need to see their faculty advisors to view these grades; all other students can view them on MySJU and should also meet with their advisors to review grades.

What can I learn from my midterm grades?

Midterm grades are a great way to check on your performance. If you’re doing well and are happy with your grades, then you know you’ve been doing things right and are in good shape heading into the second half of the semester. If you’re not doing well, then there are a few things to consider:

  • Does your midterm grade come as a surprise? Did you think you were doing better than you are? If so, meet with your instructor during office hours (listed on your syllabus or with the department) and discuss your work. Bring all of your graded work with you to meet you instructor for a more fruitful discussion.
  • Have you been putting in the effort?  Take a good hard look at your semester so far: have you been attending class? Doing the assigned readings? Turning in your assignments on-time and studying for tests and exams? If you’re unsure of how to improve, meet with your instructor and use available SJU resources.

Did you know that tutoring and other services are available?

The Learning Resource Center, located on the ground floor of Bellarmine Hall, is there to help you with your courses. They have tutors for specific courses, SIs and they can also help arrange individual tutoring; check out their tutoring schedule and list of other resources here. Additionally, the LRC offers workshops on study skills and other topics to help you with your academic success.

Should I withdraw from the course?

Many students are worried that they will fail a course and withdraw from classes so that they will not get an F on their transcript. Students who have to maintain a particular GPA for financial aid or other activities are often especially concerned. If you think that you are failing, your first step is to talk with your instructor about your performance and determine what the situation is– is there a possibility that you’ll pass the course? Do you know what steps you need to take to improve your grade?

If there is a good chance that you can bring your grade up to a passing grade, then it is worth staying in the course. If it looks certain that you will fail, then withdrawing from the course might be your better option.

What if I decide to withdraw from a course?

If you withdraw from a course, a “W” will appear on your transcript, but it will not affect your GPA. You will not receive any refund for the course.

It’s important to remember that you need to have 40 courses to graduate from SJU. (Except for Biology, with 38 courses.) Unless you have come in with AP credit or have already taken extra courses, you will need to make up one course through summer school or intersession.

Additionally, if for some reason you’re only registered for four courses and are considering dropping down to three courses, there can be implications for financial aid and housing. Make sure you speak with your financial aid advisor and that you talk to the Residence Life office about your status.

The deadline for course withdrawal is Friday, October 25 at 5 pm. You will need to meet with your faculty advisor to get his/her approval & signature. Click here for an explanation of the procedure and the form.

Inside-Out Course: Dimensions of Freedom

“I have learned two lessons in my life: first, there are no sufficient literary, psychological, or historical answers to human tragedy, only moral ones. Second, just as despair can come to one another only from other human beings, hope, too, can be given to one only by other human beings” Elie Wiesel

 Inside-Out Course: Dimensions of Freedom

May be taken for PHL or ENG credit

Instructor:  Rev. Thomas Brennan, SJ                     

E-mail: tbrennan@sju.edu                   610-660-1348

Dr. Elizabeth Linehan, RSM         

Email: elinehan@sju.edu                      610-660-1550                              

 Course Description:

This class is a unique opportunity to explore the dimensions of freedom from inside a correctional facility.  The Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program brings together students from universities and adult students who are incarcerated to learn about and to discuss the multiple dimensions of human freedom, from  literary, philosophical, and experiential points  of view. The experience of imprisonment will be an important focus of class discussion, and a starting point to examine human freedom and its limits.  Topics include: negative vs. positive freedom; freedom of action vs. inner freedom (thought, imagination, will); political freedom vs. political oppression; the extent to which freedom in any of these senses is a good, worthy of the value we tend to give it.  For each dimension, we will also ask what inner and/or external conditions limit or even preclude its exercise.

The course is being designed in such a way as to take maximum advantage of the unique setting and backgrounds of the students. 

This class will meet on:  Wednesday from 1:30 – 4, but you will need to be available from 12:30 – 5 for travel time.  SJU students will be able to count the course as either an upper division English course, or as a philosophy course (counting for 3rd level GER, for PHL major and for PHL minor). 

Application due by:  5:00 PM on October 11 EXTENDED. Please return applications to:   Thomas Brennan in  MH 135 , or Elizabeth Linehan in B/L 251.

Enrollment from SJU is limited to 15 students.  Preference will be given to seniors and juniors.  The second step of the screening process will be an in-person interview (selected from applicants based on qualifications).

 

 

APPLICATION

Name:_______________________________________________________________________

 

Address:______________________________________________________________________

 

Cell Phone:____________________     E-mail Address______________________________

 

Emergency Contact: 

Name: ______________________   Relationship:__________________                     

 

Emergency Contact Phone Number: _______________________________________

 

Date of Birth:__________________   

 

Major:______________________    

Year of Graduation: _________________________

 Current GPA: ________________

 

 

Please list three appealing things about this course:

 

  1. ________________________________________________________________________

 

  1. ________________________________________________________________________

 

  1. ________________________________________________________________________

 

What do you hope to gain by taking this course?

 

 

 

 

 

 

What other academic or extracurricular activities will you be involved in during the semester (e.g. thesis writing, sports teams, etc.) and how will it affect your participation?

 

 

 

May we contact a current or former instructor for a recommendation?  Who might that be?

 

 

Do you have an arrest or conviction record? (This probably will not be a problem, but we need to know ahead of time.) 

 

 

 

 

 

How did you hear about this course?

 

 

 

 

 

Please list blocks of times that you are available for a 20 minute interview.  If you are chosen for an interview, you will be contacted to schedule an interview time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

One writer in criminology calls the United States “the great incarcerator.”  At the present time more than 2 million people in the U.S. are in prison or jail.  The percentage of the US population that is in prison is higher than that of any other developed nation.  Why do you think this is?  Does it present a problem, or is it acceptable?

 

Please write a concise paragraph or two in response to this question, in the space below.

 

Fall 2012: Midterm Grades & Course Withdrawals

What are Midterm Grades?

Midterm grades are a progress report of your course grade to this point in the semester; they are not part of your permanent academic transcript. First Year Students will need to see their faculty advisors to view these grades; all other students can view them on MySJU and should also meet with their advisors to review grades.

What can I learn from my midterm grades?

Midterm grades are a great way to check on your performance. If you’re doing well and are happy with your grades, then you know you’ve been doing things right and are in good shape heading into the second half of the semester. If you’re not doing well, then there are a few things to consider:

  • Does your midterm grade come as a surprise? Did you think you were doing better than you are? If so, meet with your instructor during office hours (listed on your syllabus or with the department) and discuss your work. Bring all of your graded work with you to meet you instructor for a more fruitful discussion.
  • Have you been putting in the effort?  Take a good hard look at your semester so far: have you been attending class? Doing the assigned readings? Turning in your assignments on-time and studying for tests and exams? If you’re unsure of how to improve, meet with your instructor and use available SJU resources.

Did you know that tutoring and other services are available?

The Learning Resource Center, located on the ground floor of Bellarmine Hall, is there to help you with your courses. They have tutors for specific courses, SIs and they can also help arrange individual tutoring; check out their tutoring schedule and list of other resources here. Additionally, the LRC offers workshops on study skills and other topics to help you with your academic success.

Should I withdraw from the course?

Many students are worried that they will fail a course and withdraw from classes so that they will not get an F on their transcript. Students who have to maintain a particular GPA for financial aid or other activities are often especially concerned. If you think that you are failing, your first step is to talk with your instructor about your performance and determine what the situation is– is there a possibility that you’ll pass the course? Do you know what steps you need to take to improve your grade?

If there is a good chance that you can bring your grade up to a passing grade, then it is worth staying in the course. If it looks certain that you will fail, then withdrawing from the course might be your better option.

What if I decide to withdraw from a course?

If you withdraw from a course, a “W” will appear on your transcript, but it will not affect your GPA. You will not receive any refund for the course.

It’s important to remember that you need to have 40 courses to graduate from SJU. Unless you have come in with AP credit or have already taken extra courses, you will need to make up one course through summer school or intersession.

Additionally, if for some reason you’re only registered for four courses and are considering dropping down to three courses, there can be implications for financial aid and housing. Make sure you speak with your financial aid advisor and that you talk to the Residence Life office about your status.

The deadline for course withdrawal is Friday, November 2, 2012. You will need to meet with your faculty advisor to get his/her approval & signature. Click here for an explanation of the procedure and the form.

Critical Languages: What Are They and Why You Should Speak One

By Dr. Lisa Baglione, Department of  Political Science

U.S. government has designated Several languages “critical” ones, tongues that are essential of American national security and economic competitiveness.  These include Arabic, Chinese, Hindi, Urdu, Korean, (and depending on the agency, Japanese), Persian, Russian, Swahili, and Yoruba. Of these, Saint Joseph’s University offers instruction in Chinese, Japanese and Russian.  Taking one of these languages and achieving proficiency in it can provide many opportunities for a student in both public service and business because the national need for trained speakers in these languages exceeds the number of bilingual speakers available.

Students with the ability to speak these languages (and understand the cultures of CL countries[1]) are highly valuable to the government, industry and society.  That is why the State Department has a special summer scholarship program to fully fund students’ study in these areas.  (See http://clscholarship.org/). ROTC students with CL background can also earn summer grants, and senior cadets receive an extra cash incentive just for taking a critical language class.  These ROTC graduates with CLs then go on to expanded opportunities and more lucrative contracts after graduation.  In addition, government and businesses are looking for students with additional skills and experience that come with the study and knowledge of a critical language.  At SJU, students with a critical language may be able to participate in the State Department e-internship program, where they serve as an intern for an embassy abroad while living here in Philadelphia and receiving credit for a Political Science upper division course (as well as fulfilling their writing-intensive overlay).  Students with CLs can also use these talents to gain interesting internships at the Washington Center in our nation’s capital, working either for the government, non-governmental organizations (e.g., Amnesty International, Asia Watch), or lobbying firms.  And upon graduation, critical languages open many doors in industry: think of all the economic opportunities today with companies that do business with or are run out of China, Japan, Russia, and the former Soviet states where Russian is still an important means of communication.  Moreover, knowledge of one of the East Asian languages typically makes businesses confident that a student could pick up another (like Korean, for instance) and makes a candidate more attractive.  For government jobs in national intelligence and security, these critical languages are nearly essential today, as otherwise, organizations expect a Master’s degree.  However, having a critical language makes an SJU grad an attractive new hire, even with a Bachelor’s degree.

Thus, taking a Critical Language opens many doors for students and increases the likelihood of landing an exciting first job.  Those of us who speak these languages (as non-native speakers) will also say that this knowledge expands our understanding of the world and helps us to be more appreciative of other cultures, as well as provides us more insight into our own.


[1] SJU also offers numerous courses in its Economics, History, Political Science, and Modern and Classical Languages Departments that will increase students’ understanding of these cultures.

Class of 2016, need a laptop?

There are some good reasons why you may want to consider SJU’s laptop program. All incoming SJU students are eligible to buy their laptop through SJU– please follow this link for more information.

  • Of the majors in the College of Arts & Sciences, only the Psychology department has a specific laptop or system requirement. For the specifications of what Psychology majors need, click here.
  • Communication Studies majors may want to consider the SJU Apple bundle for Communications Studies, but it is not required. For more information, click here.

Going off-line.

How many times have you found yourself checking Facebook or Twitter when you’re trying to study? Is it five times an hour? 10? More? Are you constantly being interrupted by texts when you’re in class or at the library?

As we enter the last week of the semester, many of you are finishing up research papers and final projects. Final exams are just around the corner. Do you feel prepared for all of these last requirements, or are you wondering how you’re going to get everything done in time?

In talking with students, one issue about studying has come up repeatedly: the distraction of the internet and texting. It’s difficult to focus on reading, writing or studying with constant interruptions. So, as you enter into this crunch time of the semester, consider the following:

Find a quiet, distraction-free zone for studying. If your roommates are in the room and not studying, go somewhere else. Or make a pact with them for quiet study times. Leave your dorm and try the new Post Learning Commons, where there are several quiet zones, marked here in orange.

If you’re using your laptop, turn off your wireless. It’s painful, but you can do it! Or leave the laptop somewhere else and study with your books, handouts, notebooks and a pen.

Turn your phone off! Mute it and put it away in your bag so you won’t automatically reach for it every five seconds.

You might be surprised by how much more productive your are once you eliminate some of the distractions. For some other online tools to help, read this blog.

Summer Classes at SJU

Do you want to get ahead with your classes or do you need to pick up an extra course for graduation? You can take summer courses at SJU in a wide range of departments; some GEP and GER required courses will be offered– check out your options here. Students are allowed to take two courses over the summer. Don’t forget, summer courses at SJU are factored into your GPA, which makes them a good way to boost your GPA, too.

How do I register for summer courses?

-Stop by BL 122 to pick up a form or download & print one out here.

-Meet with your faculty advisor to discuss what courses you would like to take. Don’t forget to have your advisor sign the form! If you have general questions about summer courses, you can also meet with us in BL 122.

-Drop the form off at the Dean’s office (BL 113) for CAS courses, or MV 289 for HSB classes.

-If your request is approved, you will be registered by the Dean’s office (CAS) or HSB for the course(s)

Review the fine print on the second page of the form! Make sure you know the drop and withdrawal deadlines are for summer courses– you will be registered for the courses but it is your responsibility to drop or withdraw from any course by the specified deadline.

ACESJU: A Program for Urban Education & Teaching Certification

Are you interested in getting certified to teach after graduation? Are you committed to Catholic education and want to be part of its future? The Alliance for Catholic Education at Saint Joseph’s University (ACESJU) is a two-year teaching fellows program for students who have completed their undergraduate degree. Fellows teach full-time in Philadelphia Catholic schools while working towards their Master’s in Education with certification from SJU. Teaching Fellows live together in program housing and receive support and formation through the “four pillars of the ACESJU program– teaching, community, spirituality, and simple living.”

The application deadline is February 15. Graduating seniors and recent graduates are encouraged to find out more about the program.  Learn more about this year’s group of Fellows and read about the program here. Come to an information session:

Wednesday, February 1, 2012  7 PM – 9 PM, 270 Connolly Hall

or

Thursday, February 2, 11:30 AM – 1 PM,  270 Connolly Hall

Snacks will be provided.

For more information, please contact Michael O’Connor, Assistant Director of Programs, Alliance for Catholic Education at Saint Joseph’s University, moconn01@sju.edu, (610) 660-1766.

New Year, New Semester

Doug Coulter 2 grade report card 1947

Before classes begin again, it’s a good time to take stock of your academic progress this year. How did your Fall semester turn out? Are you happy with your grades? Did you do as well as you had hoped? If so, congratulations and keep up the good work! If not, it’s time to think about what needs to change so that your Spring semester can be more successful.

Some things to consider:

**What courses did you do well in? What was it about these courses that you especially liked? Was it the content, the professor or the type of assignments? If so, look for other courses similar to those you liked.

**What courses did you struggle in? Was it the type of course, the work load or the effort you put into it? If these courses were in your major, do you feel like you’ll be able to do better in the future? If not, is your major the right one for you? Talk with your faculty advisor and come see us in the Advising Support Center (Barbelin 122) if you’re unsure about your declared major and your courses for Spring.

**Did you put as much work into the class as you could have? If so, and you still feel like you didn’t do as well as expected, talk with your professors early in the semester to see about how to succeed in their courses. Also, look into tutoring and SI sessions for the courses.

**Did you use your time effectively? Did you make quiet, distraction-free study time a priority in your schedule? Did you complete readings before class and get assignments done on-time? Did you give yourself time to write drafts of papers and take them to the Writing Center or to your professors for feedback? If the answer to any of these was “no”, you might want to think about making some changes in how your prioritize your academics.

Come see us in the CAS Advising Support Center and take advantage of the services provided by the Learning Resource Center and get ready for a great Spring semester!