The LSAT…

When thinking about graduation and the plans after college, many people question what is the next step of the journey? Some may start their careers while others will attend graduate school to further their degree. For me, part of the journey has always been to attend law school. The preparation for law school begins with the LSAT’s. For those who do not know, the LSAT is the Law School Admission Test. The test essentially is to see where you stand in the law school admission process. Scores range from 120 to 180 with the typical median score of 150. In June of this year, I signed up to take the test. Though I had months of preparation, the test was still difficult. Now that I am done and wait anxiously for my score, I thought that I should provide any one who may be thinking about law school some advice.

For those who want to take the LSAT, you need to know that you will have a long road ahead of you. Before taking the test there is a lot of preparation required. LSAC.org will be where you begin. This site will provide you with the tools needed to guide, the prospective law school student through the admission process. On this site you will be able to sign up for the LSAT’s, find information on prospective law schools and information on applying. After applying to take the LSAT’s there are a few things you must understand. The test is broken down into 6 sections, 4 of which are calculated towards the final score. The sections consist of 2 logical reasoning, 1 logic game, and 1 reading comprehension. Each section is 35 minutes in length. There are two unscored sections also 35 minutes in length, one is considered “experimental” and could be any part of the test and the other is a brief writing sample. There is one break 10-15 minutes during the test as well.

Those individuals, who are planning on taking the test, should be prepared to buy books and sign up for classes. You must focus on breaking down the test section by section. If you want to do your best, you have to become masterful in each section independently.

My advice would be before you begin to delve into a class or study session, take a practice test. Breakdown the test and see how you did in each area. See where your weaknesses are. In many cases you will not do well in your first practice test. Do not let this discourage you; you will get better in time. As the old saying goes “practice makes perfect” and with the LSAT this is very true. The more you practice the sections you are weakest in, the better you will become. Individuals will vary on expertise level. Some may find one section more difficult then others. For me one of the most challenging sections in the test was the reading comprehension. For me I had to remember to break each story down into sections. However, usually the most difficult section for students is the logic games. Many individuals find this section to be extremely difficult. My advice, remember to take your time and break each game down. This test are not a measurement of your knowledge, it is designed to project your ability to excel in law school. It is unique and requires that you understand the format and type of questions.

 

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Do your research on LSAT prep courses. There are many out there, onsite and online. Choose a course that works for you. Everyone learns differently, for me an online course with live instruction fit my immediate needs.

My first LSAT was not only a nerve-racking experience, but also a memorable one. I feel as though I was very prepared to take the test, and was ready to give it my best shot. Though the test was difficult, I put my best foot forward. I will find out my results sometime in July, I am in confident that no matter what the outcome I was prepared.

If you are planning to take the test my recommendation would be to practice and sign up for a course. Explore the LSAC website, as the website states, “very few people achieve their full potential on the LSAT without some preparation”. I wish all of those preparing for the LSAT’s good luck!!

Posted in: After SJU (Graduation & Post-Graduation), Uncategorized

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