The ATDL Team

Meet us and how we work

A Self-Managed Team

How it works

The work we do requires transparent communication, a shared vision, and ongoing team reflection and evaluation, which is why we have proposed the “self-managed” team approach.

Definition:
Self-managed work teams are groups of employees who are responsible for managing and performing technical tasks that result in a product or service being delivered to an internal or external customer (Yeatts & Hyten, 1998). They are relatively autonomous work groups in which the responsibilities and duties traditionally maintained by management have been transferred to the team as a whole (Rogers & Kaplan, 1995). Kirkman and Shapiro (1997) suggest that self-man- aged work teams are comprised of two dynamic components, one being the process of self-management and the other collaborative teamwork.

Yang, S., & Guy, M. E. (2004, March). Index Volume 27. Public Performance & Management Review, 27(3), 60-79.

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Meet the Team

The work we do requires transparent communication, a shared vision, and ongoing team reflection and evaluation, which is why we have proposed the “self-managed” team approach.

Karen Pinto

Learner Experience Designer

Chontel Delaney

Learner Experience Designer

Kathy Scarpato

Learner Experience Designer

Don Lowing

Learner Experience Media Producer

Mary Ann McMenamin

Academic Compliance Officer

Team: Cohesion

Helping a group become cohesive is the first step toward team success (Nahavandi & Malekzadeh, 1999). Yeatts and Hyten (1998) studied highly cohesive nursing home SMWT and concluded that their cohesion positively influenced effort, as manifested by the fact that their high cohesiveness resulted in team members' routinely working beyond scheduled hours without additional pay.

Team: Trust

Trust refers to team member faith in others' intentions and actions (Nahavandi & Malekzadeh, 1999). Golembiewski and McConkie (1975) suggest that trust is the most influential of all interpersonal variables in public organizations. Larson and LaFasto (1989) reported that trust is positively related to several work process factors, including the amount of effort expended and the talents applied to the work.

Team: Communication

Experts in management theory have also concluded that communication is important for productivity (Euske & Roberts, 1987; Goldhaber, 1986; Harris, 1993; Hill, 1982; Pincus, 1984; Putnam & Cheney, 1990). The amount of communication and degree of coordination affects how smoothly a unit operates and how much support there is for individual needs and concerns (Guy, in press).

Organizational: Shared beliefs

Experts in management theory have also concluded that communication is important for productivity (Euske & Roberts, 1987; Goldhaber, 1986; Harris, 1993; Hill, 1982; Pincus, 1984; Putnam & Cheney, 1990). The amount of communication and degree of coordination affects how smoothly a unit operates and how much support there is for individual needs and concerns (Guy, in press).

Organizational: Rewards

Experts in management theory have also concluded that communication is important for productivity (Euske & Roberts, 1987; Goldhaber, 1986; Harris, 1993; Hill, 1982; Pincus, 1984; Putnam & Cheney, 1990). The amount of communication and degree of coordination affects how smoothly a unit operates and how much support there is for individual needs and concerns (Guy, in press).

Organizational: Training

Training has been found to provide team members with the knowledge and skills needed for them to perform at a high level (Johnson & Johnson, 1994; Kanter, 1982). Hickman and Creighton-Zollar (1998) emphasize that the performance of SMWT cannot be left to chance and human resource managers must develop multifaceted training programs to help team members understand the interdependent elements of teamwork and diversity.

Yang, S., & Guy, M. E. (2004, March). Index Volume 27. Public Performance & Management Review, 27(3), 60-79.

ATDL

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The Drexel Library
Faculty Learning Lounge, Suite 160
atdl@sju.edu

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